ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
What you need to know about swine flu.
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Add your Article

Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments

(HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered the nausea-easing powers of ginger that many grandmothers are already familiar with, and report that the spice helped cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy.

"Ginger at a daily dose of 0.5-to-1 gram significantly aids in the reduction of chemotherapy-related nausea on the first day of chemotherapy, and reduced nausea will lead to improved quality of life in many cancer patients," said study author Julie Ryan, an assistant professor of dermatology and radiation oncology at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester, said during a Thursday teleconference highlighting research that will be presented later this month during the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Florida.

That dose is the equivalent of 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon of ground ginger, she added.

The trial participants, mostly women and mostly breast cancer patients, were also taking conventional drugs to quell vomiting.

"A lot of patients ask us as oncologists, 'Is there anything more I can do to deal with chemotherapy-induced nausea?' " said Dr. Douglas Blayney, president-elect of ASCO and medical director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

The majority of patients undergoing chemotherapy do have nausea and vomiting. And nausea can persist even if actual vomiting is stopped. Some 70 percent of patients in chemo still have the symptoms even with common use of antiemetic, or anti-vomiting, drugs.

Ginger is a spice that has been widely used for decades to treat nausea and vomiting, Ryan stated.

These researchers, supported by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, enrolled 644 cancer patients who had already experienced nausea after chemotherapy. All participants had to still be facing at least three rounds of chemo.

The trial is the largest of its kind, according to the researchers.

Participants were randomized to receive either a placebo or one of three doses of ginger supplement: 0.5 grams, 1 gram or 1.5 grams for three days before the start of chemo and three days after for the next two cycles. All also received traditional antiemetic drugs on the first day of treatment.

Most patients report the most severe nausea and vomiting on the first day of chemo, Ryan said. If nausea can be reduced during this critical time period, subsequent nausea is also less likely.

While all doses of ginger helped with nausea, "The largest reduction in nausea occurred with 0.5 and 1 gram of ginger, which was about a 40 percent reduction in nausea," Ryan reported. The effect tended to wear off over the next 24 hours.

It wasn't clear if the same effects would be seen with ginger products, such as tea, ginger cookies and sushi, the researchers said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on the side effects of chemotherapy.



SOURCES: May 14, 2009, teleconference with Julie Ryan, Ph.D., assistant professor, dermatology and radiation oncology, University of Rochester, and Douglas Blayney, M.D., president-elect, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and medical director, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com