ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
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Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
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Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
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Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
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Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
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Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
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Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
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Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
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Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
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Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
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Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments

(HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered the nausea-easing powers of ginger that many grandmothers are already familiar with, and report that the spice helped cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy.

"Ginger at a daily dose of 0.5-to-1 gram significantly aids in the reduction of chemotherapy-related nausea on the first day of chemotherapy, and reduced nausea will lead to improved quality of life in many cancer patients," said study author Julie Ryan, an assistant professor of dermatology and radiation oncology at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester, said during a Thursday teleconference highlighting research that will be presented later this month during the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Florida.

That dose is the equivalent of 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon of ground ginger, she added.

The trial participants, mostly women and mostly breast cancer patients, were also taking conventional drugs to quell vomiting.

"A lot of patients ask us as oncologists, 'Is there anything more I can do to deal with chemotherapy-induced nausea?' " said Dr. Douglas Blayney, president-elect of ASCO and medical director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

The majority of patients undergoing chemotherapy do have nausea and vomiting. And nausea can persist even if actual vomiting is stopped. Some 70 percent of patients in chemo still have the symptoms even with common use of antiemetic, or anti-vomiting, drugs.

Ginger is a spice that has been widely used for decades to treat nausea and vomiting, Ryan stated.

These researchers, supported by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, enrolled 644 cancer patients who had already experienced nausea after chemotherapy. All participants had to still be facing at least three rounds of chemo.

The trial is the largest of its kind, according to the researchers.

Participants were randomized to receive either a placebo or one of three doses of ginger supplement: 0.5 grams, 1 gram or 1.5 grams for three days before the start of chemo and three days after for the next two cycles. All also received traditional antiemetic drugs on the first day of treatment.

Most patients report the most severe nausea and vomiting on the first day of chemo, Ryan said. If nausea can be reduced during this critical time period, subsequent nausea is also less likely.

While all doses of ginger helped with nausea, "The largest reduction in nausea occurred with 0.5 and 1 gram of ginger, which was about a 40 percent reduction in nausea," Ryan reported. The effect tended to wear off over the next 24 hours.

It wasn't clear if the same effects would be seen with ginger products, such as tea, ginger cookies and sushi, the researchers said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on the side effects of chemotherapy.



SOURCES: May 14, 2009, teleconference with Julie Ryan, Ph.D., assistant professor, dermatology and radiation oncology, University of Rochester, and Douglas Blayney, M.D., president-elect, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and medical director, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

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