ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Add your Article

Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments

(HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered the nausea-easing powers of ginger that many grandmothers are already familiar with, and report that the spice helped cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy.

"Ginger at a daily dose of 0.5-to-1 gram significantly aids in the reduction of chemotherapy-related nausea on the first day of chemotherapy, and reduced nausea will lead to improved quality of life in many cancer patients," said study author Julie Ryan, an assistant professor of dermatology and radiation oncology at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester, said during a Thursday teleconference highlighting research that will be presented later this month during the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Florida.

That dose is the equivalent of 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon of ground ginger, she added.

The trial participants, mostly women and mostly breast cancer patients, were also taking conventional drugs to quell vomiting.

"A lot of patients ask us as oncologists, 'Is there anything more I can do to deal with chemotherapy-induced nausea?' " said Dr. Douglas Blayney, president-elect of ASCO and medical director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

The majority of patients undergoing chemotherapy do have nausea and vomiting. And nausea can persist even if actual vomiting is stopped. Some 70 percent of patients in chemo still have the symptoms even with common use of antiemetic, or anti-vomiting, drugs.

Ginger is a spice that has been widely used for decades to treat nausea and vomiting, Ryan stated.

These researchers, supported by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, enrolled 644 cancer patients who had already experienced nausea after chemotherapy. All participants had to still be facing at least three rounds of chemo.

The trial is the largest of its kind, according to the researchers.

Participants were randomized to receive either a placebo or one of three doses of ginger supplement: 0.5 grams, 1 gram or 1.5 grams for three days before the start of chemo and three days after for the next two cycles. All also received traditional antiemetic drugs on the first day of treatment.

Most patients report the most severe nausea and vomiting on the first day of chemo, Ryan said. If nausea can be reduced during this critical time period, subsequent nausea is also less likely.

While all doses of ginger helped with nausea, "The largest reduction in nausea occurred with 0.5 and 1 gram of ginger, which was about a 40 percent reduction in nausea," Ryan reported. The effect tended to wear off over the next 24 hours.

It wasn't clear if the same effects would be seen with ginger products, such as tea, ginger cookies and sushi, the researchers said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on the side effects of chemotherapy.



SOURCES: May 14, 2009, teleconference with Julie Ryan, Ph.D., assistant professor, dermatology and radiation oncology, University of Rochester, and Douglas Blayney, M.D., president-elect, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and medical director, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com