ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Add your Article

Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change will push summer temperatures higher and lead to more hospitalizations for respiratory problems, a European study finds.

The researchers analyzed a minimum of three years of hospital admission data in 12 European cities. They found that for every degree increase over 90 percent of a city's maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax), there was a 4 percent increase in respiratory-related hospitalizations. A rise in temperature was not linked to increases in admissions for cardiovascular or neurovascular-related conditions.

The Tappmax, which accounts for both air temperature and humidity, ranged from 14.7 degrees C (58 F) in Dublin, Ireland to 29.5 degrees C (85 F) in Valencia, Spain.

Respiratory-related hospital admissions increased among residents of all ages when temperatures moved above 90 percent of Tappmax, but people aged 75 and older were especially affected, the study found.

It's known that increased temperatures can boost cardiovascular emergencies, so the finding that cardiovascular-related hospitalizations did not increase with temperature came as a surprise. But the researchers suggested this may be because many patients who experience cardiovascular emergencies die before they can receive medical treatment.

The study appears in the first issue for March of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

"These findings are important for public health because the prevalence of chronic diseases, such as [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], is expected to increase in developed countries as a result of population aging," wrote Paola Michelozzi, head of environmental epidemiology in the epidemiology department at the Local Health Authority in Rome, Italy.

"Furthermore, under climate change scenarios, the increase in extreme weather events and certain air pollutants, especially ozone, are likely to further aggravate chronic respiratory diseases. Public health interventions should be directed at preventing this additional burden of disease during the summer season. The observed (differences) of the health effects indicates a need to tailor programs for individual cities," Michelozzi concluded.

More information

The World Health Organization has more about climate and health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, Feb. 20, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2009

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