ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Countdown to Hair Loss
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change will push summer temperatures higher and lead to more hospitalizations for respiratory problems, a European study finds.

The researchers analyzed a minimum of three years of hospital admission data in 12 European cities. They found that for every degree increase over 90 percent of a city's maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax), there was a 4 percent increase in respiratory-related hospitalizations. A rise in temperature was not linked to increases in admissions for cardiovascular or neurovascular-related conditions.

The Tappmax, which accounts for both air temperature and humidity, ranged from 14.7 degrees C (58 F) in Dublin, Ireland to 29.5 degrees C (85 F) in Valencia, Spain.

Respiratory-related hospital admissions increased among residents of all ages when temperatures moved above 90 percent of Tappmax, but people aged 75 and older were especially affected, the study found.

It's known that increased temperatures can boost cardiovascular emergencies, so the finding that cardiovascular-related hospitalizations did not increase with temperature came as a surprise. But the researchers suggested this may be because many patients who experience cardiovascular emergencies die before they can receive medical treatment.

The study appears in the first issue for March of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

"These findings are important for public health because the prevalence of chronic diseases, such as [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], is expected to increase in developed countries as a result of population aging," wrote Paola Michelozzi, head of environmental epidemiology in the epidemiology department at the Local Health Authority in Rome, Italy.

"Furthermore, under climate change scenarios, the increase in extreme weather events and certain air pollutants, especially ozone, are likely to further aggravate chronic respiratory diseases. Public health interventions should be directed at preventing this additional burden of disease during the summer season. The observed (differences) of the health effects indicates a need to tailor programs for individual cities," Michelozzi concluded.

More information

The World Health Organization has more about climate and health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, Feb. 20, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2009

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