ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
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Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating

(HealthDay News) -- The holiday season means you'll be faced with a seemingly endless buffet of food temptation. While some people simply give in and eat too much, others deny themselves any holiday treats.

But there are ways to navigate between overindulgence and deprivation, according to Julie Redfern, manager of Nutrition Consult Services at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. She offers the following advice:

* Eat a light snack before you go to a holiday party. That will prevent you from arriving hungry and overeating or gobbling down foods high in calories and saturated fat.
* When you're invited to a party, offer to bring a healthy food dish.
* Research how you can use healthy ingredients in your favorite holiday recipes. For example, using 1 percent milk instead of whole milk and cream in a traditional eggnog recipe can save almost 200 calories and 20 grams of fat per serving.
* Wear tight clothes, such as form-fitting slacks, to holiday events. People who wear loose clothing tend to overeat without realizing it.
* Staying away from the food table at gatherings will help you resist the urge to eat.
* Carrying a clutch or handbag will keep your hands busy and reduce the likelihood that you'll reach for every treat that passes your way.
* Use a small plate or no plate. You'll eat less if you have to walk back and forth to get food.
* Keep portion control in mind. A dinner plate should be half vegetables, a quarter protein, and a quarter carbs. Avoid going back for seconds and thirds.
* You can have dessert, but keep the portions small.
* Beware of high-calorie holiday drinks such as eggnog and apple cider. Have only a small cup.
* Plan to go for a family walk after your main holiday meal.

SOURCES: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, Nov. 18, 2009