ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Go To Work But Skip The Car

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who walk or cycle to work have fewer risk factors for heart disease, a U.S. study has found.

The study included 2,364 men and women who worked outside the home. At physical examinations conducted in 2005 and 2006, the participants reported details about their commute to work, including length in minutes and miles, and the percentage of the journey taken by car, public transit, walking or cycling.

The researchers found that 16.7 percent of the participants walked or cycled to work (active commuting), and those men and women appeared to be more fit. Those who were active commuters were less likely to be overweight or obese and had healthier triglyceride, blood pressure and insulin levels.

The study, published in the July 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, adds to evidence that cycling or walking to work improves health, said Penny Gordon-Larsen of the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"Public support for policies that encourage active commuting has been shown, particularly for individuals with experience using active commuting and with positive attitudes toward walking and biking," they wrote. "Furthermore, increasing active commuting will have the dual benefits of increasing population health and in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental supports for commuting, such as physical environment and sociocultural factors, have been shown to promote active forms of commuting."

Further research should be done to identify other potential benefits of active commuting, they concluded.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, July 13, 2009