ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Go To Work But Skip The Car

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who walk or cycle to work have fewer risk factors for heart disease, a U.S. study has found.

The study included 2,364 men and women who worked outside the home. At physical examinations conducted in 2005 and 2006, the participants reported details about their commute to work, including length in minutes and miles, and the percentage of the journey taken by car, public transit, walking or cycling.

The researchers found that 16.7 percent of the participants walked or cycled to work (active commuting), and those men and women appeared to be more fit. Those who were active commuters were less likely to be overweight or obese and had healthier triglyceride, blood pressure and insulin levels.

The study, published in the July 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, adds to evidence that cycling or walking to work improves health, said Penny Gordon-Larsen of the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"Public support for policies that encourage active commuting has been shown, particularly for individuals with experience using active commuting and with positive attitudes toward walking and biking," they wrote. "Furthermore, increasing active commuting will have the dual benefits of increasing population health and in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental supports for commuting, such as physical environment and sociocultural factors, have been shown to promote active forms of commuting."

Further research should be done to identify other potential benefits of active commuting, they concluded.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, July 13, 2009