ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Eat Light - Live Longer
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
What you need to know about swine flu.
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Go To Work But Skip The Car

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who walk or cycle to work have fewer risk factors for heart disease, a U.S. study has found.

The study included 2,364 men and women who worked outside the home. At physical examinations conducted in 2005 and 2006, the participants reported details about their commute to work, including length in minutes and miles, and the percentage of the journey taken by car, public transit, walking or cycling.

The researchers found that 16.7 percent of the participants walked or cycled to work (active commuting), and those men and women appeared to be more fit. Those who were active commuters were less likely to be overweight or obese and had healthier triglyceride, blood pressure and insulin levels.

The study, published in the July 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, adds to evidence that cycling or walking to work improves health, said Penny Gordon-Larsen of the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"Public support for policies that encourage active commuting has been shown, particularly for individuals with experience using active commuting and with positive attitudes toward walking and biking," they wrote. "Furthermore, increasing active commuting will have the dual benefits of increasing population health and in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental supports for commuting, such as physical environment and sociocultural factors, have been shown to promote active forms of commuting."

Further research should be done to identify other potential benefits of active commuting, they concluded.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, July 13, 2009