ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Add your Article

Go To Work But Skip The Car

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who walk or cycle to work have fewer risk factors for heart disease, a U.S. study has found.

The study included 2,364 men and women who worked outside the home. At physical examinations conducted in 2005 and 2006, the participants reported details about their commute to work, including length in minutes and miles, and the percentage of the journey taken by car, public transit, walking or cycling.

The researchers found that 16.7 percent of the participants walked or cycled to work (active commuting), and those men and women appeared to be more fit. Those who were active commuters were less likely to be overweight or obese and had healthier triglyceride, blood pressure and insulin levels.

The study, published in the July 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, adds to evidence that cycling or walking to work improves health, said Penny Gordon-Larsen of the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"Public support for policies that encourage active commuting has been shown, particularly for individuals with experience using active commuting and with positive attitudes toward walking and biking," they wrote. "Furthermore, increasing active commuting will have the dual benefits of increasing population health and in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental supports for commuting, such as physical environment and sociocultural factors, have been shown to promote active forms of commuting."

Further research should be done to identify other potential benefits of active commuting, they concluded.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, July 13, 2009