ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Go To Work But Skip The Car

TUESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who walk or cycle to work have fewer risk factors for heart disease, a U.S. study has found.

The study included 2,364 men and women who worked outside the home. At physical examinations conducted in 2005 and 2006, the participants reported details about their commute to work, including length in minutes and miles, and the percentage of the journey taken by car, public transit, walking or cycling.

The researchers found that 16.7 percent of the participants walked or cycled to work (active commuting), and those men and women appeared to be more fit. Those who were active commuters were less likely to be overweight or obese and had healthier triglyceride, blood pressure and insulin levels.

The study, published in the July 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, adds to evidence that cycling or walking to work improves health, said Penny Gordon-Larsen of the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"Public support for policies that encourage active commuting has been shown, particularly for individuals with experience using active commuting and with positive attitudes toward walking and biking," they wrote. "Furthermore, increasing active commuting will have the dual benefits of increasing population health and in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental supports for commuting, such as physical environment and sociocultural factors, have been shown to promote active forms of commuting."

Further research should be done to identify other potential benefits of active commuting, they concluded.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, July 13, 2009