ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Add your Article

Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Residues of two insecticides widely used on golf courses do not pose a health risk, new research says.

Sevin SL (using the active ingredient carbaryl) and Dursban Pro (chlorpyrifos), when applied at the maximum U.S.-approved label rate and followed with irrigation, are of little concern to golfers, according to findings published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

"After extensive monitoring, estimated exposures to golfers following full applications of two turfgrass insecticides that are used throughout the northeastern United States were 19 to 68 times lower than levels set by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency designed to protect human health," toxicology expert John Clark, a professor of veterinary and animal sciences at University of Massachusetts Amherst, said in a news release issued by the university.

More than 100 million pounds of the active ingredients found in pesticides were applied to golf courses and residential lawns each year, according to the 1998 and 1999 Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage Report.

"Because of the large amount of time people spend in turf environments, exposure to pesticides from treated turf is a potentially significant exposure pathway," Clark said.

The test were performed on volunteers playing 76 simulated rounds of golf on a test plot of turf given eight EPA-maximum applications of chlorpyrifos and two applications of carbaryl. The volunteers clothing and urine were tested for the pesticides and their breakdown products.

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about pesticide safety.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Massachusetts, Amherst, news release, July 29, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 13, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com