ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Residues of two insecticides widely used on golf courses do not pose a health risk, new research says.

Sevin SL (using the active ingredient carbaryl) and Dursban Pro (chlorpyrifos), when applied at the maximum U.S.-approved label rate and followed with irrigation, are of little concern to golfers, according to findings published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

"After extensive monitoring, estimated exposures to golfers following full applications of two turfgrass insecticides that are used throughout the northeastern United States were 19 to 68 times lower than levels set by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency designed to protect human health," toxicology expert John Clark, a professor of veterinary and animal sciences at University of Massachusetts Amherst, said in a news release issued by the university.

More than 100 million pounds of the active ingredients found in pesticides were applied to golf courses and residential lawns each year, according to the 1998 and 1999 Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage Report.

"Because of the large amount of time people spend in turf environments, exposure to pesticides from treated turf is a potentially significant exposure pathway," Clark said.

The test were performed on volunteers playing 76 simulated rounds of golf on a test plot of turf given eight EPA-maximum applications of chlorpyrifos and two applications of carbaryl. The volunteers clothing and urine were tested for the pesticides and their breakdown products.

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about pesticide safety.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Massachusetts, Amherst, news release, July 29, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 13, 2008

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