ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Residues of two insecticides widely used on golf courses do not pose a health risk, new research says.

Sevin SL (using the active ingredient carbaryl) and Dursban Pro (chlorpyrifos), when applied at the maximum U.S.-approved label rate and followed with irrigation, are of little concern to golfers, according to findings published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

"After extensive monitoring, estimated exposures to golfers following full applications of two turfgrass insecticides that are used throughout the northeastern United States were 19 to 68 times lower than levels set by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency designed to protect human health," toxicology expert John Clark, a professor of veterinary and animal sciences at University of Massachusetts Amherst, said in a news release issued by the university.

More than 100 million pounds of the active ingredients found in pesticides were applied to golf courses and residential lawns each year, according to the 1998 and 1999 Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage Report.

"Because of the large amount of time people spend in turf environments, exposure to pesticides from treated turf is a potentially significant exposure pathway," Clark said.

The test were performed on volunteers playing 76 simulated rounds of golf on a test plot of turf given eight EPA-maximum applications of chlorpyrifos and two applications of carbaryl. The volunteers clothing and urine were tested for the pesticides and their breakdown products.

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has more about pesticide safety.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Massachusetts, Amherst, news release, July 29, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 13, 2008

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