ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus

TUESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- The grapefruit flavonoid naringenin inhibits the secretion of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in infected cells and could offer a new approach for treating the disease, according to a Harvard Medical School study.

About 3 percent of the global population is infected with HCV, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. The current standard therapy of interferon and ribavirin is only effective in about 50 percent of cases and can cause major side effects, according to background information in the study.

Recent research suggests that HVC may be "hitching a ride" along the lipoprotein life cycle, and that compounds and dietary supplements that influence lipoprotein metabolism may also affect HCV.

In this new study, researchers demonstrated that HCV is actively secreted by infected cells while bound to a very low-density lipoprotein.

"Silencing apolipoprotein B (Apo-B) mRNA in infected cells causes a 70 percent reduction in the secretion of both ApoB-100 and HCV. This ApoB-dependent HCV secretion pathway suggests a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCV infection," the researchers wrote.

They then tested the grapefruit flavonoid naringenin and found it reduced HCV secretion in infected cells by 80 percent.

"The concept of supplementing HCV patients' diets with naringenin is appealing," the researchers wrote. But they noted the intestinal wall doesn't absorb naringenin well, which means therapeutic doses of the flavonoid would have to be given by injection or combined with other compounds to boost its absorption by the intestines.

The researchers also noted that naringenin and several other compounds in grapefruit have significant drug-drug interactions.

"Future studies would focus on long-term ability of naringenin and perhaps other citrus flavonoids to reduce viral load in animal models and long-term cultures of primary human hepatocytes," the researchers concluded.

The study was published in the May issue of Hepatology.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about hepatitis C.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Hepatology, news release, April 29, 2008

Last Updated: May 06, 2008

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