ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus

TUESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- The grapefruit flavonoid naringenin inhibits the secretion of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in infected cells and could offer a new approach for treating the disease, according to a Harvard Medical School study.

About 3 percent of the global population is infected with HCV, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. The current standard therapy of interferon and ribavirin is only effective in about 50 percent of cases and can cause major side effects, according to background information in the study.

Recent research suggests that HVC may be "hitching a ride" along the lipoprotein life cycle, and that compounds and dietary supplements that influence lipoprotein metabolism may also affect HCV.

In this new study, researchers demonstrated that HCV is actively secreted by infected cells while bound to a very low-density lipoprotein.

"Silencing apolipoprotein B (Apo-B) mRNA in infected cells causes a 70 percent reduction in the secretion of both ApoB-100 and HCV. This ApoB-dependent HCV secretion pathway suggests a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCV infection," the researchers wrote.

They then tested the grapefruit flavonoid naringenin and found it reduced HCV secretion in infected cells by 80 percent.

"The concept of supplementing HCV patients' diets with naringenin is appealing," the researchers wrote. But they noted the intestinal wall doesn't absorb naringenin well, which means therapeutic doses of the flavonoid would have to be given by injection or combined with other compounds to boost its absorption by the intestines.

The researchers also noted that naringenin and several other compounds in grapefruit have significant drug-drug interactions.

"Future studies would focus on long-term ability of naringenin and perhaps other citrus flavonoids to reduce viral load in animal models and long-term cultures of primary human hepatocytes," the researchers concluded.

The study was published in the May issue of Hepatology.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about hepatitis C.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Hepatology, news release, April 29, 2008

Last Updated: May 06, 2008

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