ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

A key component of green tea has shown promise as a non-toxic treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are now in the second phase of trials with early-stage, asymptomatic patients to explore the potential of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to strike a blow against this type of leukemia.

"The benefits we have seen in most CLL patients who use the chemical suggest that it has modest clinical activity and may be useful for stabilizing this form of leukemia, potentially slowing it down," lead author Dr. Tait Shanafelt, a Mayo Clinic hematologist, said in a news release.

Shanafelt's team is slated to present its findings Monday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, in Chicago.

The latest research builds on earlier Mayo lab work from eight years ago, during which EGCG's potential to curtail the survival of CLL leukemia cells was first noted. The current trial marks the first time this green tea extract has been studied in actual patients as a treatment option for an illness that is described as a hybrid between leukemia and lymphoma.

A total of 42 CLL patients were involved in the phase 2 trial. All were at such an early point in their illness that they were not taking any other treatment.

Nearly one-third showed a 20 percent or greater drop in their leukemia cell count after being treated with EGCG.

What's more, almost 70 percent of the patients who had enlarged lymph nodes saw their node size cut in half or more following treatment, the researchers found.

Yet despite the encouraging findings, the study authors cautioned that EGCG would not ultimately replace chemotherapy. And they expressed hesitancy with respect to any current patient use of the compound while research is ongoing.

"Without a phase 3 clinical trial, we cannot make a recommendation that EGCG be used by CLL patients," co-author Dr. Neil Kay, a hematology researcher, said in a news release. "But those who want to take supplements should consult with their oncologists and need to receive appropriate monitoring using laboratory tests."

SOURCES: American Society of Clinical Oncology, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010