ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Eating Free Range
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
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Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

A key component of green tea has shown promise as a non-toxic treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are now in the second phase of trials with early-stage, asymptomatic patients to explore the potential of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to strike a blow against this type of leukemia.

"The benefits we have seen in most CLL patients who use the chemical suggest that it has modest clinical activity and may be useful for stabilizing this form of leukemia, potentially slowing it down," lead author Dr. Tait Shanafelt, a Mayo Clinic hematologist, said in a news release.

Shanafelt's team is slated to present its findings Monday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, in Chicago.

The latest research builds on earlier Mayo lab work from eight years ago, during which EGCG's potential to curtail the survival of CLL leukemia cells was first noted. The current trial marks the first time this green tea extract has been studied in actual patients as a treatment option for an illness that is described as a hybrid between leukemia and lymphoma.

A total of 42 CLL patients were involved in the phase 2 trial. All were at such an early point in their illness that they were not taking any other treatment.

Nearly one-third showed a 20 percent or greater drop in their leukemia cell count after being treated with EGCG.

What's more, almost 70 percent of the patients who had enlarged lymph nodes saw their node size cut in half or more following treatment, the researchers found.

Yet despite the encouraging findings, the study authors cautioned that EGCG would not ultimately replace chemotherapy. And they expressed hesitancy with respect to any current patient use of the compound while research is ongoing.

"Without a phase 3 clinical trial, we cannot make a recommendation that EGCG be used by CLL patients," co-author Dr. Neil Kay, a hematology researcher, said in a news release. "But those who want to take supplements should consult with their oncologists and need to receive appropriate monitoring using laboratory tests."

SOURCES: American Society of Clinical Oncology, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010