ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Functional Foods Uncovered
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

A key component of green tea has shown promise as a non-toxic treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are now in the second phase of trials with early-stage, asymptomatic patients to explore the potential of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to strike a blow against this type of leukemia.

"The benefits we have seen in most CLL patients who use the chemical suggest that it has modest clinical activity and may be useful for stabilizing this form of leukemia, potentially slowing it down," lead author Dr. Tait Shanafelt, a Mayo Clinic hematologist, said in a news release.

Shanafelt's team is slated to present its findings Monday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, in Chicago.

The latest research builds on earlier Mayo lab work from eight years ago, during which EGCG's potential to curtail the survival of CLL leukemia cells was first noted. The current trial marks the first time this green tea extract has been studied in actual patients as a treatment option for an illness that is described as a hybrid between leukemia and lymphoma.

A total of 42 CLL patients were involved in the phase 2 trial. All were at such an early point in their illness that they were not taking any other treatment.

Nearly one-third showed a 20 percent or greater drop in their leukemia cell count after being treated with EGCG.

What's more, almost 70 percent of the patients who had enlarged lymph nodes saw their node size cut in half or more following treatment, the researchers found.

Yet despite the encouraging findings, the study authors cautioned that EGCG would not ultimately replace chemotherapy. And they expressed hesitancy with respect to any current patient use of the compound while research is ongoing.

"Without a phase 3 clinical trial, we cannot make a recommendation that EGCG be used by CLL patients," co-author Dr. Neil Kay, a hematology researcher, said in a news release. "But those who want to take supplements should consult with their oncologists and need to receive appropriate monitoring using laboratory tests."

SOURCES: American Society of Clinical Oncology, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010