ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
The Food Irradiation Story
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
More Single Women Are Having Babies
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer

(HealthDay News) -- A new study appears to add to growing evidence that green tea might help protect against cancer.

U.S. researchers gave 41 volunteers with pre-malignant mouth lesions green tea extract for three months at doses of 500 milligrams per meter squared (mg/m2), 750 mg/m2 or 1,000 mg/m2. The extract was taken by mouth. Other participants took a placebo.

The study found that about 59 percent of people taking the highest dose of the green tea extract showed a clinical response, compared with 18 percent of those who took a placebo. The researchers also noted a trend toward improvement in certain biomarkers that could predict cancer development.

During the study period of about 28 months, 15 people developed oral cancer. People who took the green tea extract and those who didn't were equally likely to develop the cancer. However, people who had mild to moderate dysplasia, or abnormal cell growth, at the start of the study took longer to develop oral cancer if they took the green tea extract.

Study author Dr. Vassiliki Papadimitrakopoulo, a professor in the department of thoracic/head and neck medical oncology at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, said the findings were encouraging but did not provide definitive proof that green tea can prevent cancer.

"This is a phase 2 study with a very limited number of patients who took what would be the equivalent of drinking eight to 10 cups of green tea every single day. We cannot with certainty claim prevention benefits from a trial of this size," Papadimitrakopoulo said in a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research.

"The goal of this kind of research is to determine whether or not these supplements have long-term prevention effects," Papadimitrakopoulo noted. "More research, including studies in which individuals at high risk are exposed to these supplements for longer time periods, is still needed to answer that sort of question."

The findings were released online in advance of publication in the November print issue of the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Nov. 5, 2009 Published on: November 05, 2009