ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer

(HealthDay News) -- A new study appears to add to growing evidence that green tea might help protect against cancer.

U.S. researchers gave 41 volunteers with pre-malignant mouth lesions green tea extract for three months at doses of 500 milligrams per meter squared (mg/m2), 750 mg/m2 or 1,000 mg/m2. The extract was taken by mouth. Other participants took a placebo.

The study found that about 59 percent of people taking the highest dose of the green tea extract showed a clinical response, compared with 18 percent of those who took a placebo. The researchers also noted a trend toward improvement in certain biomarkers that could predict cancer development.

During the study period of about 28 months, 15 people developed oral cancer. People who took the green tea extract and those who didn't were equally likely to develop the cancer. However, people who had mild to moderate dysplasia, or abnormal cell growth, at the start of the study took longer to develop oral cancer if they took the green tea extract.

Study author Dr. Vassiliki Papadimitrakopoulo, a professor in the department of thoracic/head and neck medical oncology at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, said the findings were encouraging but did not provide definitive proof that green tea can prevent cancer.

"This is a phase 2 study with a very limited number of patients who took what would be the equivalent of drinking eight to 10 cups of green tea every single day. We cannot with certainty claim prevention benefits from a trial of this size," Papadimitrakopoulo said in a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research.

"The goal of this kind of research is to determine whether or not these supplements have long-term prevention effects," Papadimitrakopoulo noted. "More research, including studies in which individuals at high risk are exposed to these supplements for longer time periods, is still needed to answer that sort of question."

The findings were released online in advance of publication in the November print issue of the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Nov. 5, 2009 Published on: November 05, 2009