ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) - Greener neighborhoods, with lots of trees, help inner city kids keep excess pounds at bay, according to a U.S. study.

"Previous work, including our own, has provided snapshots in time, and shown that for children in densely population cities, the greener the neighborhood, the lower the risk of obesity. Our new study of over 3,800 inner-city children revealed that living in areas with green space has a long-term positive impact on children's weight and thus health," study senior author Gilbert C. Liu, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine, said in a school news release.

The children in the study, ages 3 to 18 years, were in the same residence for more than 24 consecutive months. Higher neighborhood "greenness" was associated with slower increases in body mass index (BMI) over time, regardless of age, race or sex, said the researchers. They added this slowing of BMI could reduce the risk of child obesity in the long term.

The findings were published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Trees and other urban vegetation improve a neighborhood's appearance, reduce pollution, and keep the area cooler in the summer -- all of which encourage children to be outside playing, walking and running, the team said.

Being active reduces the risk of obesity, which is associated with a number of health problems including type 2 diabetes, asthma, hypertension, sleep apnea and emotional distress. Obese children are likely to become obese adults.

"Obesity is a national epidemic necessitating the involvement of health-care providers, parents, and the community," Liu said. "Our lifestyle makes us sedentary and less healthy. For children, physical activity is active play, and that usually takes place outdoors. We need to encourage them to go outside and play. I love the idea that we can landscape for health."

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about overweight and obesity in children.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Indiana University, news release, Oct. 28, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 14, 2008

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