ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Add your Article

Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) - Greener neighborhoods, with lots of trees, help inner city kids keep excess pounds at bay, according to a U.S. study.

"Previous work, including our own, has provided snapshots in time, and shown that for children in densely population cities, the greener the neighborhood, the lower the risk of obesity. Our new study of over 3,800 inner-city children revealed that living in areas with green space has a long-term positive impact on children's weight and thus health," study senior author Gilbert C. Liu, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine, said in a school news release.

The children in the study, ages 3 to 18 years, were in the same residence for more than 24 consecutive months. Higher neighborhood "greenness" was associated with slower increases in body mass index (BMI) over time, regardless of age, race or sex, said the researchers. They added this slowing of BMI could reduce the risk of child obesity in the long term.

The findings were published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Trees and other urban vegetation improve a neighborhood's appearance, reduce pollution, and keep the area cooler in the summer -- all of which encourage children to be outside playing, walking and running, the team said.

Being active reduces the risk of obesity, which is associated with a number of health problems including type 2 diabetes, asthma, hypertension, sleep apnea and emotional distress. Obese children are likely to become obese adults.

"Obesity is a national epidemic necessitating the involvement of health-care providers, parents, and the community," Liu said. "Our lifestyle makes us sedentary and less healthy. For children, physical activity is active play, and that usually takes place outdoors. We need to encourage them to go outside and play. I love the idea that we can landscape for health."

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about overweight and obesity in children.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Indiana University, news release, Oct. 28, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 14, 2008

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