ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
Tune Up Your Health With Music
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
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Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health

(HealthDay News) -- U.S. environmental officials said Monday that greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide endanger people's health.

The so-called endangerment finding was announced by Lisa P. Jackson, the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at an afternoon press conference. It could signal a possible first step by the EPA to regulate greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. But Jackson said the agency would prefer that Congress pass legislation that would limit production of the pollutants.

"The scientific community, the business community and the policy world have spent decades studying greenhouse gas pollution and climate change," Jackson said, adding that there have been alarming increases in the amount of greenhouse gases over the years.

"That increase is deteriorating the natural balance in our atmosphere and changing our climate -- the threat is real," she said.

This finding means the Obama administration is prepared to act to limit global warming without Congressional support.

The finding is also noteworthy as the United States prepares to take part in a 192-nation climate conference that began Monday in Copenhagen, Denmark. In the past, the United States has been criticized for dragging its feet on efforts to combat global warming.

The endangerment finding means that "we arrive at the climate talks in Copenhagen with a clear demonstration of our commitment to facing this global challenge," Jackson said.

Previous research has linked air pollution to a variety of diseases, including heart disease, cancer and asthma.

In announcing the finding Monday, Jackson did not specifically state what diseases can be caused by greenhouse gases, which are largely produced by factories, power plants and motor vehicles that burn fossil fuels such as oil and coal.

Environmental groups applauded Monday's EPA announcement.

"As the major global warming summit begins this week in Copenhagen, this announcement couldn't come at a more important time," Carl Pope, executive director of the Sierra Club, said in a prepared statement. "The Obama administration has followed through on its pledge to act and is demonstrating that the U.S. has turned away from eight years of inaction under the Bush administration," he stated.

"This is one more key commitment President Obama can bring to the world to show that the U.S. will do its part to fight global warming," Pope said.

The endangerment finding comes after a 2007 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said such a finding was necessary before the EPA could use the federal Clean Air Act to regulate carbon dioxide and five other greenhouse gases from power plants, factories and automobiles, Jackson said.

Jackson noted that a similar finding was sent to the Bush White House, but was never acted upon.

"This administration will not ignore science or the law any longer, nor will we avoid the responsibility we owe to our children and grandchildren," she said.

In April the EPA started taking public comments about global warming, a sign that the agency was moving to a view that greenhouse gases pose a health threat.

While environmental groups support the new finding, some business groups, such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, have been opposed to using the Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases. The chamber said in a statement that "the endangerment declaration could spark a cascade of litigation and regulation that could harm the economy."

According to the EPA, regulation of greenhouse gases will not begin immediately. The administration's preference is that Congress take the lead in passing a cap on carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, Jackson said.

Jackson said she was hopeful that Congress would pass a greenhouse gas emissions bill that the president could sign.

Under a separate action, the EPA has begun requiring large producers of greenhouse gases to start reporting the amount of these gases they release into the environment. This will allow the EPA to track greenhouse gas emissions, Jackson said.

In another effort to limit greenhouse gases, the Obama administration, under the Clean Cars Program, will mandate that average automobile mileage increase to 35 miles per gallon by 2016, Jackson said.

SOURCES: Dec. 7, 2009, teleconference with Lisa P. Jackson, administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Dec. 7, 2009, news release, the Sierra Club; Dec. 7, 2009, news release, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Published on: December 07, 2009