ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage

With May designated as UV awareness month, experts are calling on parents to pay special heed to the safety of their children's eyes this summer.

Although eye protection is a concern for people of all ages, Prevent Blindness America, the nation's oldest eye health and safety organization, warns that children are particularly vulnerable to the harmful ultraviolet A and B (UVA and UVB) damage that can accompany sun exposure.

For one, children generally spend more time in the sun, the group noted. In addition, the organization highlights the American Optometric Association's cautionary finding that the lenses of young eyes are more transparent than that of adults, risking retinal exposure to a greater degree of short wavelength light.

"We need to remember to protect our eyes from UV every day of the year," Hugh R. Parry, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, said in a news release. "UV rays reflecting off the water, sand, pavement and even snow are extremely dangerous. We can encourage our children to wear the proper eye protection by leading by example."

UV exposure has been linked to the onset of cataracts, macular degeneration and a wide array of eye health issues, the experts noted.

Prevent Blindness America advises that everyone who goes out in the sun should wear sunglasses that block out 99 percent to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation -- noting that sunglasses without such protection can actually cause the pupils to dilate, thereby doing more harm than good.

A wide-brimmed hat or cap also offers some measure of eye protection, the group suggested.

With specific respect to children, Prevent Blindness America further encourages parents to ensure that sunglasses fit their child's face properly and shields the sun's rays from all directions. The group points out that wrap-around sunglasses might be optimal in the later regard, because they additionally protect the skin immediately surrounding a child's eyes.

Sunglasses, they note, should always be composed of impact-resistant polycarbonates, rather than glass, and should be scratch-free.

SOURCES: Prevent Blindness America, news release, May 2010