ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage

With May designated as UV awareness month, experts are calling on parents to pay special heed to the safety of their children's eyes this summer.

Although eye protection is a concern for people of all ages, Prevent Blindness America, the nation's oldest eye health and safety organization, warns that children are particularly vulnerable to the harmful ultraviolet A and B (UVA and UVB) damage that can accompany sun exposure.

For one, children generally spend more time in the sun, the group noted. In addition, the organization highlights the American Optometric Association's cautionary finding that the lenses of young eyes are more transparent than that of adults, risking retinal exposure to a greater degree of short wavelength light.

"We need to remember to protect our eyes from UV every day of the year," Hugh R. Parry, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, said in a news release. "UV rays reflecting off the water, sand, pavement and even snow are extremely dangerous. We can encourage our children to wear the proper eye protection by leading by example."

UV exposure has been linked to the onset of cataracts, macular degeneration and a wide array of eye health issues, the experts noted.

Prevent Blindness America advises that everyone who goes out in the sun should wear sunglasses that block out 99 percent to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation -- noting that sunglasses without such protection can actually cause the pupils to dilate, thereby doing more harm than good.

A wide-brimmed hat or cap also offers some measure of eye protection, the group suggested.

With specific respect to children, Prevent Blindness America further encourages parents to ensure that sunglasses fit their child's face properly and shields the sun's rays from all directions. The group points out that wrap-around sunglasses might be optimal in the later regard, because they additionally protect the skin immediately surrounding a child's eyes.

Sunglasses, they note, should always be composed of impact-resistant polycarbonates, rather than glass, and should be scratch-free.

SOURCES: Prevent Blindness America, news release, May 2010