ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks

SUNDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- You might be able to cut down on snacking by chewing more sugarless gum.

During an experiment, people were offered a variety of snacks three hours after a standard lunch and were told they could eat as much of the snacks as they desired. One afternoon the participants also chewed sugarless gum for 15 minutes each hour in the period between lunch and snack time. The other afternoon, gum-chewing was not allowed during that time.

The researchers found that people ate fewer snacks and shaved 40 calories off their in-between meal consumption when they chewed gum, compared with their snack consumption when they didn't chew gum.

The participants -- 115 men and women 18 to 54 years old, all regular gum-chewers -- said that they generally didn't feel as hungry or as desirous of a sweet treat after chewing the gum. They also reported having good energy throughout the afternoon and feeling less drowsy at mid-afternoon snack time than they did on an afternoon when they chewed no gum.

The results were to be presented April 19 in New Orleans at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference.

"Overall, this research demonstrates the potential role chewing gum can play in appetite control, reduction of snack cravings and weight management," researcher Paula J Geiselman, chief of women's health and eating behavior and smoking cessation at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, said in a news release from the conference sponsors. "Even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. And, this research supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for managing snack, especially sweet snack, intake and cravings."

The study was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the company that makes chewing gum.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more about healthy eating.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, news release, April 19, 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2009

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