ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Eating your way to Good Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Barefoot Best for Running?
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Go To Work But Skip The Car
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks

SUNDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- You might be able to cut down on snacking by chewing more sugarless gum.

During an experiment, people were offered a variety of snacks three hours after a standard lunch and were told they could eat as much of the snacks as they desired. One afternoon the participants also chewed sugarless gum for 15 minutes each hour in the period between lunch and snack time. The other afternoon, gum-chewing was not allowed during that time.

The researchers found that people ate fewer snacks and shaved 40 calories off their in-between meal consumption when they chewed gum, compared with their snack consumption when they didn't chew gum.

The participants -- 115 men and women 18 to 54 years old, all regular gum-chewers -- said that they generally didn't feel as hungry or as desirous of a sweet treat after chewing the gum. They also reported having good energy throughout the afternoon and feeling less drowsy at mid-afternoon snack time than they did on an afternoon when they chewed no gum.

The results were to be presented April 19 in New Orleans at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference.

"Overall, this research demonstrates the potential role chewing gum can play in appetite control, reduction of snack cravings and weight management," researcher Paula J Geiselman, chief of women's health and eating behavior and smoking cessation at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, said in a news release from the conference sponsors. "Even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. And, this research supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for managing snack, especially sweet snack, intake and cravings."

The study was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the company that makes chewing gum.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more about healthy eating.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, news release, April 19, 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2009

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