ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
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Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks

SUNDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- You might be able to cut down on snacking by chewing more sugarless gum.

During an experiment, people were offered a variety of snacks three hours after a standard lunch and were told they could eat as much of the snacks as they desired. One afternoon the participants also chewed sugarless gum for 15 minutes each hour in the period between lunch and snack time. The other afternoon, gum-chewing was not allowed during that time.

The researchers found that people ate fewer snacks and shaved 40 calories off their in-between meal consumption when they chewed gum, compared with their snack consumption when they didn't chew gum.

The participants -- 115 men and women 18 to 54 years old, all regular gum-chewers -- said that they generally didn't feel as hungry or as desirous of a sweet treat after chewing the gum. They also reported having good energy throughout the afternoon and feeling less drowsy at mid-afternoon snack time than they did on an afternoon when they chewed no gum.

The results were to be presented April 19 in New Orleans at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference.

"Overall, this research demonstrates the potential role chewing gum can play in appetite control, reduction of snack cravings and weight management," researcher Paula J Geiselman, chief of women's health and eating behavior and smoking cessation at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, said in a news release from the conference sponsors. "Even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. And, this research supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for managing snack, especially sweet snack, intake and cravings."

The study was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the company that makes chewing gum.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more about healthy eating.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, news release, April 19, 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2009

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