ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Add your Article

Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks

SUNDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- You might be able to cut down on snacking by chewing more sugarless gum.

During an experiment, people were offered a variety of snacks three hours after a standard lunch and were told they could eat as much of the snacks as they desired. One afternoon the participants also chewed sugarless gum for 15 minutes each hour in the period between lunch and snack time. The other afternoon, gum-chewing was not allowed during that time.

The researchers found that people ate fewer snacks and shaved 40 calories off their in-between meal consumption when they chewed gum, compared with their snack consumption when they didn't chew gum.

The participants -- 115 men and women 18 to 54 years old, all regular gum-chewers -- said that they generally didn't feel as hungry or as desirous of a sweet treat after chewing the gum. They also reported having good energy throughout the afternoon and feeling less drowsy at mid-afternoon snack time than they did on an afternoon when they chewed no gum.

The results were to be presented April 19 in New Orleans at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference.

"Overall, this research demonstrates the potential role chewing gum can play in appetite control, reduction of snack cravings and weight management," researcher Paula J Geiselman, chief of women's health and eating behavior and smoking cessation at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, said in a news release from the conference sponsors. "Even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. And, this research supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for managing snack, especially sweet snack, intake and cravings."

The study was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the company that makes chewing gum.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more about healthy eating.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, news release, April 19, 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2009

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