ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks

SUNDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- You might be able to cut down on snacking by chewing more sugarless gum.

During an experiment, people were offered a variety of snacks three hours after a standard lunch and were told they could eat as much of the snacks as they desired. One afternoon the participants also chewed sugarless gum for 15 minutes each hour in the period between lunch and snack time. The other afternoon, gum-chewing was not allowed during that time.

The researchers found that people ate fewer snacks and shaved 40 calories off their in-between meal consumption when they chewed gum, compared with their snack consumption when they didn't chew gum.

The participants -- 115 men and women 18 to 54 years old, all regular gum-chewers -- said that they generally didn't feel as hungry or as desirous of a sweet treat after chewing the gum. They also reported having good energy throughout the afternoon and feeling less drowsy at mid-afternoon snack time than they did on an afternoon when they chewed no gum.

The results were to be presented April 19 in New Orleans at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference.

"Overall, this research demonstrates the potential role chewing gum can play in appetite control, reduction of snack cravings and weight management," researcher Paula J Geiselman, chief of women's health and eating behavior and smoking cessation at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, said in a news release from the conference sponsors. "Even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. And, this research supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for managing snack, especially sweet snack, intake and cravings."

The study was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the company that makes chewing gum.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more about healthy eating.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, news release, April 19, 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2009

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