ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Maximize Your Run
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Add your Article

Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks

SUNDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- You might be able to cut down on snacking by chewing more sugarless gum.

During an experiment, people were offered a variety of snacks three hours after a standard lunch and were told they could eat as much of the snacks as they desired. One afternoon the participants also chewed sugarless gum for 15 minutes each hour in the period between lunch and snack time. The other afternoon, gum-chewing was not allowed during that time.

The researchers found that people ate fewer snacks and shaved 40 calories off their in-between meal consumption when they chewed gum, compared with their snack consumption when they didn't chew gum.

The participants -- 115 men and women 18 to 54 years old, all regular gum-chewers -- said that they generally didn't feel as hungry or as desirous of a sweet treat after chewing the gum. They also reported having good energy throughout the afternoon and feeling less drowsy at mid-afternoon snack time than they did on an afternoon when they chewed no gum.

The results were to be presented April 19 in New Orleans at the Experimental Biology 2009 conference.

"Overall, this research demonstrates the potential role chewing gum can play in appetite control, reduction of snack cravings and weight management," researcher Paula J Geiselman, chief of women's health and eating behavior and smoking cessation at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, said in a news release from the conference sponsors. "Even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. And, this research supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for managing snack, especially sweet snack, intake and cravings."

The study was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the company that makes chewing gum.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more about healthy eating.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, news release, April 19, 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2009

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