ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery

MONDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Chewing gum helps improve recovery of intestinal function after all or part of the colon has been surgically removed, according to British researchers who reviewed data from five clinical trials involving 158 patients.

The inability of the intestines to pass contents after surgery (postoperative ileus) is normal among abdominal surgery patients and is a major contributing factor to post-surgery nausea, vomiting, cramps, and the pain and discomfort associated with abdominal distension, according to background information in the article.

In each of the five trials, a group of patients who chewed sugarless gum for five to 45 minutes, three times a day, after abdominal surgery were compared to a group of patients who didn't chew gum. Patients who chewed gum took an average of 0.66 fewer days to pass gas and an average of 1.10 fewer days to have a bowel movement than those who didn't chew gum. Patients who chewed gum also spent less time in the hospital.

It's believed that gum chewing acts as a type of "sham feeding" that stimulates nerves in the digestive system, prompting release of gastrointestinal hormones and increasing production of saliva and secretions from the pancreas, said the researchers at St. Mary's Hospital in London.

"In conclusion, we feel that the evidence suggests that gum chewing following abdominal surgery offers significant benefits in reducing the time to resolution of ileus; however, the studies are insufficiently powered to identify a significant benefit in length of stay," they wrote.

"The potential benefits to individual patients, in health economics terms, are such that a well-designed, large-scale, blinded, randomized, controlled trial with a placebo arm is warranted to answer the question of whether gum chewing can significantly reduce the length of stay after abdominal surgery or whether it merely represents a placebo effect."

The study was published in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

More information

The American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons has more about colorectal screenings and treatments.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Aug. 18, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 18, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com