ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Add your Article

Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety

SATURDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Prevent Blindness America reminds everyone that a happy Halloween should be a safe one when it comes to your eyes.

"Halloween can be one of the most enjoyable times of the year, as long as we all remember that safety is the key to a wonderful holiday," President and CEO Hugh R. Parry said in a news release from the volunteer eye health and safety organization. "Everything from having an open flame in a jack-o-lantern to wearing a mask that distorts our vision can turn a festive evening into a terrible accident."

When it comes to protecting the eyes of trick-or-treaters and revelers, Prevent Blindness America offers these recommendations:

* Avoid costumes that could block vision such as some masks, wigs, hats or eye patches.
* Use hypoallergenic or non-toxic make-up. Only adults should apply make-up to children. To remove it, use cold cream or eye make-up remover instead of soap.
* Use false eyelashes according to the manufacturer's instructions on the package.
* Avoid props or accessories with sharp edges or pointed ends such as pitchforks, spears, knives, swords or wands.
* Never use non-prescription contact lenses to change their eye color or even give the illusion of cat's eyes. Without a prescription, these are illegal to purchase whether the lens are corrective or not. Improper use of contacts can lead to eye infections, corneal injuries and even vision loss.
* When trick-or-treating, always wear bright, reflective clothing or decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape/patches. Carry a bright flashlight to improve visibility.

More information

The Prevent Blindness America has more about contact lens safety.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Prevent Blindness America, news release, Sept. 29, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 25, 2008

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