ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Functional Foods Uncovered
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Add your Article

Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A home-based diet and exercise program slowed the decline of physical function in older, overweight cancer survivors, new research has found.

The study participants included 641 people in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, aged 65 to 91, who were overweight and were long-term (five years or more) survivors of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. Some were assigned to a control group, while others were assigned to a 12-month intervention program that included telephone counseling, mailed materials promoting exercise, improved diet, and modest weight loss.

The study, published in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that duration of strength-training exercise and endurance exercise minutes increased in the intervention group but stayed the same in the control group.

The researchers also found that the average intake of fruits and vegetables increased by 1.24 daily servings in the intervention group and by 0.13 daily servings in the control group. Average daily consumption of saturated fat decreased by 3.06 grams in the intervention group and by 1.07 grams in the control group. Members of the intervention group lost an average of 4.5 pounds, compared to 2.03 pounds in the control group.

At the start of the study, the average functional score for all the participants was 75.7 out of 100, which is comparable with the midpoint score for men and women aged 65 or older. By the end of the study, functional scores had declined an average of 2.15 points in the intervention group, compared to a decline of 4.84 points in the control group.

"Future studies should not only assess the effect [of exercise and diet intervention] on health and well-being, but also should address cost-related outcomes, especially given that the economic burden associated with functional decline and loss of independence is exceedingly high," according to study author Miriam C. Morey, of Duke University in Durham, N.C., and colleagues.

More information

The American Cancer Society offers health tips for cancer survivors.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, May 12, 2009

Last Updated: May 12, 2009

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