ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
CANCER
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure

SATURDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a low-salt diet is one of the most important lifestyle changes people with heart failure can make, but only a third adhere to the recommendation, a new study has found.

Researchers asked 116 people with heart failure to write down everything they ate for three days. Though the recommended daily intake of sodium for people with heart failure is 2,000 milligrams, participants in the study were consuming an average of 2,671 mg a day.

Many weren't purposefully ignoring doctor's recommendations, said study co-author Carolyn M. Reilly, a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University in Atlanta. Most thought they were taking steps to reduce their sodium by putting less salt on their foods, but she said they were focused on the wrong target.

About 70 percent of the sodium in the American diet comes from processed foods such as canned soups, lunch meats and fast food, not from salt added to home-cooked meals.

Sodium is added to foods to give them a longer shelf life, enhance texture and mask bitterness.

"There is so much salt hidden in foods that patients aren't aware of," Reilly said in a news release from the American Heart Association.

The research was to be presented Saturday at the American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

The American Heart Association recommends that healthy people try to eat less than 2,300 mg of salt a day. Some people -- including blacks, middle-aged and older adults and people with high blood pressure -- should aim for less than 1,500 mg a day.

"The patients themselves were shocked to find out they were eating more than 2,000 mg of sodium a day," Reilly said.

Some of the highest-sodium foods eaten by the study participants included hot dogs, sausage and bacon, canned soups, salad dressings, condiments, fast food, lunch meat, bread, pizza, processed entrees, prepared grits and cornbread.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on low-sodium diets.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 25, 2009

Last Updated: April 25, 2009

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