ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Add your Article

Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure

SATURDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a low-salt diet is one of the most important lifestyle changes people with heart failure can make, but only a third adhere to the recommendation, a new study has found.

Researchers asked 116 people with heart failure to write down everything they ate for three days. Though the recommended daily intake of sodium for people with heart failure is 2,000 milligrams, participants in the study were consuming an average of 2,671 mg a day.

Many weren't purposefully ignoring doctor's recommendations, said study co-author Carolyn M. Reilly, a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University in Atlanta. Most thought they were taking steps to reduce their sodium by putting less salt on their foods, but she said they were focused on the wrong target.

About 70 percent of the sodium in the American diet comes from processed foods such as canned soups, lunch meats and fast food, not from salt added to home-cooked meals.

Sodium is added to foods to give them a longer shelf life, enhance texture and mask bitterness.

"There is so much salt hidden in foods that patients aren't aware of," Reilly said in a news release from the American Heart Association.

The research was to be presented Saturday at the American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

The American Heart Association recommends that healthy people try to eat less than 2,300 mg of salt a day. Some people -- including blacks, middle-aged and older adults and people with high blood pressure -- should aim for less than 1,500 mg a day.

"The patients themselves were shocked to find out they were eating more than 2,000 mg of sodium a day," Reilly said.

Some of the highest-sodium foods eaten by the study participants included hot dogs, sausage and bacon, canned soups, salad dressings, condiments, fast food, lunch meat, bread, pizza, processed entrees, prepared grits and cornbread.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on low-sodium diets.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 25, 2009

Last Updated: April 25, 2009

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