ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure

SATURDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a low-salt diet is one of the most important lifestyle changes people with heart failure can make, but only a third adhere to the recommendation, a new study has found.

Researchers asked 116 people with heart failure to write down everything they ate for three days. Though the recommended daily intake of sodium for people with heart failure is 2,000 milligrams, participants in the study were consuming an average of 2,671 mg a day.

Many weren't purposefully ignoring doctor's recommendations, said study co-author Carolyn M. Reilly, a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University in Atlanta. Most thought they were taking steps to reduce their sodium by putting less salt on their foods, but she said they were focused on the wrong target.

About 70 percent of the sodium in the American diet comes from processed foods such as canned soups, lunch meats and fast food, not from salt added to home-cooked meals.

Sodium is added to foods to give them a longer shelf life, enhance texture and mask bitterness.

"There is so much salt hidden in foods that patients aren't aware of," Reilly said in a news release from the American Heart Association.

The research was to be presented Saturday at the American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

The American Heart Association recommends that healthy people try to eat less than 2,300 mg of salt a day. Some people -- including blacks, middle-aged and older adults and people with high blood pressure -- should aim for less than 1,500 mg a day.

"The patients themselves were shocked to find out they were eating more than 2,000 mg of sodium a day," Reilly said.

Some of the highest-sodium foods eaten by the study participants included hot dogs, sausage and bacon, canned soups, salad dressings, condiments, fast food, lunch meat, bread, pizza, processed entrees, prepared grits and cornbread.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on low-sodium diets.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 25, 2009

Last Updated: April 25, 2009

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