ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure

SATURDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a low-salt diet is one of the most important lifestyle changes people with heart failure can make, but only a third adhere to the recommendation, a new study has found.

Researchers asked 116 people with heart failure to write down everything they ate for three days. Though the recommended daily intake of sodium for people with heart failure is 2,000 milligrams, participants in the study were consuming an average of 2,671 mg a day.

Many weren't purposefully ignoring doctor's recommendations, said study co-author Carolyn M. Reilly, a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University in Atlanta. Most thought they were taking steps to reduce their sodium by putting less salt on their foods, but she said they were focused on the wrong target.

About 70 percent of the sodium in the American diet comes from processed foods such as canned soups, lunch meats and fast food, not from salt added to home-cooked meals.

Sodium is added to foods to give them a longer shelf life, enhance texture and mask bitterness.

"There is so much salt hidden in foods that patients aren't aware of," Reilly said in a news release from the American Heart Association.

The research was to be presented Saturday at the American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

The American Heart Association recommends that healthy people try to eat less than 2,300 mg of salt a day. Some people -- including blacks, middle-aged and older adults and people with high blood pressure -- should aim for less than 1,500 mg a day.

"The patients themselves were shocked to find out they were eating more than 2,000 mg of sodium a day," Reilly said.

Some of the highest-sodium foods eaten by the study participants included hot dogs, sausage and bacon, canned soups, salad dressings, condiments, fast food, lunch meat, bread, pizza, processed entrees, prepared grits and cornbread.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on low-sodium diets.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 25, 2009

Last Updated: April 25, 2009

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