ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
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High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged exposure to high temperatures degrades the antifungal properties of the ReNu with MoistureLoc contact lens solution, which was implicated in a U.S. eye infection outbreak between 2004 and 2006, a new study says.

ReNu with MoistureLoc contains a microbial agent not found in other contact lens solutions. Between August 2004 and March 2006, there were 154 confirmed cases of the eye infection Fusarium keratitis among users of ReNu with MoistureLoc, made by Bausch & Lomb, the study authors said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cited the company for inadequate temperature control in the production, storage and transport of ReNu with MoistureLoc produced at Bausch & Lomb's Greenville, S.C., plant.

In the new study, Dr. John D. Bullock, of the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, and colleagues conducted tests on ReNu with MoistureLoc and five other contact lens solutions.

"Two bottles of each solution were separately stored at room temperature and 60 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Fahrenheit) for four weeks, serially diluted and then tested for their ability to inhibit growth of 11 Fusariam isolates [seven of which were associated with the keratitis epidemic]," the researchers wrote.

Compared to the other solutions, ReNu with MoistureLoc showed the greatest decline in antifungal activity when stored at 60 degrees C. Clear Care and ReNu MultiPlus performed the best, the researchers said.

When the researchers focused on the strains of Fusariam associated with the keratitis outbreak, ReNu with MoistureLoc allowed fungal growth in 27 of 84 combinations when stored at room temperature and in 67 of 84 combinations when stored at 60 degrees C.

The study was published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

"The precise temperature, duration of exposure to elevated temperature and extent of temperature fluctuation that may diminish the antimicrobial activity of a particular contact lens solution is not known, and thus, additional studies may be warranted. However, our findings, coupled with the FDA reports of Bausch & Lomb's failure to regulate the storage and transport temperatures of the products manufactured in their Greensville plant, may be significant," the study authors concluded.

"Knowledge of the potential loss of antimicrobial activity of contact lens solutions and other pharmaceutical products when exposed to higher temperatures and the risk of such exposure when storing and transporting those products may help prevent such epidemics in the future," the researchers added.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about contact lenses and eye infections.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Nov. 10, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 10, 2008

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