ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Add your Article

Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Getting in shape really does help you live longer, new research says.

People with high levels of physical fitness, called cardiorespiratory fitness, have a lower risk of dying from all causes of death, including coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, than people with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness.

Researchers analyzed data from 33 previous studies that included 102,980 participants and 6,910 deaths from a variety of causes and 84,323 people with coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease and 4,485 deaths caused by those conditions.

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) was estimated as maximal aerobic capacity (MAC) expressed in metabolic equivalent (MET) units.

Participants were categorized as having low CRF (less than 7.9 METs), intermediate CRF (7.9-10.8 METs), or high CRF (10.9 METs or greater).

Participants with low CRF had a 70 percent higher risk for all-cause death and a 56 percent higher risk for coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events than those with high CRF, according to the study, published in the May 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Those with low CRF had a 40 percent higher risk for all-cause death and a 47 percent increased risk for cardiovascular disease than those with intermediate CRF.

The analysis suggest that a minimal CRF of 7.9 METs may be important to prevent mortality from all causes, including coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, the researchers wrote.

To have adequate CRF, men around 50 years of age must be capable of continuous walking at a speed of 4 m.p.h. and women at 3 m.p.h.

CRF can be assessed by exercise tolerance testing, researchers said. Still, it's rare for clinicians to consider CRF when evaluating future risk of coronary heart disease.

"It is possible that consideration of low CRF as a major coronary risk factor could be put into practical use in the clinical setting through identification of low exercise tolerance by exercise stress testing or in daily life by the speed at which a person can walk before experiencing exhaustion," the researchers wrote.

The analysis also found that a 1-MET higher level of MAC, which corresponds to 0.6 mile/hour higher running/jogging speed, was associated with a decrease of 13 percent in risk of all-cause mortality and a 15 percent decrease in risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease.

More information

The AARP has tips on exercise for adults over age 50.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, May 19, 2009

Last Updated: May 19, 2009

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