ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating your way to Good Health
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Add your Article

Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Getting in shape really does help you live longer, new research says.

People with high levels of physical fitness, called cardiorespiratory fitness, have a lower risk of dying from all causes of death, including coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, than people with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness.

Researchers analyzed data from 33 previous studies that included 102,980 participants and 6,910 deaths from a variety of causes and 84,323 people with coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease and 4,485 deaths caused by those conditions.

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) was estimated as maximal aerobic capacity (MAC) expressed in metabolic equivalent (MET) units.

Participants were categorized as having low CRF (less than 7.9 METs), intermediate CRF (7.9-10.8 METs), or high CRF (10.9 METs or greater).

Participants with low CRF had a 70 percent higher risk for all-cause death and a 56 percent higher risk for coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events than those with high CRF, according to the study, published in the May 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Those with low CRF had a 40 percent higher risk for all-cause death and a 47 percent increased risk for cardiovascular disease than those with intermediate CRF.

The analysis suggest that a minimal CRF of 7.9 METs may be important to prevent mortality from all causes, including coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, the researchers wrote.

To have adequate CRF, men around 50 years of age must be capable of continuous walking at a speed of 4 m.p.h. and women at 3 m.p.h.

CRF can be assessed by exercise tolerance testing, researchers said. Still, it's rare for clinicians to consider CRF when evaluating future risk of coronary heart disease.

"It is possible that consideration of low CRF as a major coronary risk factor could be put into practical use in the clinical setting through identification of low exercise tolerance by exercise stress testing or in daily life by the speed at which a person can walk before experiencing exhaustion," the researchers wrote.

The analysis also found that a 1-MET higher level of MAC, which corresponds to 0.6 mile/hour higher running/jogging speed, was associated with a decrease of 13 percent in risk of all-cause mortality and a 15 percent decrease in risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease.

More information

The AARP has tips on exercise for adults over age 50.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, May 19, 2009

Last Updated: May 19, 2009

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