ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Maximize Your Run
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
What you need to know about swine flu.
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Maximize Your Run
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Add your Article

Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk

"We found that daily intakes of vitamin D by adults in the range of 4,000-8,000 IU are needed to maintain blood levels of vitamin D metabolites in the range needed to reduce by about half the risk of several diseases -- breast cancer, colon cancer, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes," study co-author Dr. Cedric Garland, a professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of California at San Diego, said in a university news release.

Garland admitted that he was surprised that the levels required were so much higher than the 400 IU a day needed to vanquish rickets in the 20th century.

Vitamin D supplements often come in pills or capsules containing 1,000 or 2,000 international units. But 4,000 to 8,000 IU a day is still much lower than the range considered safe by the National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine, the researchers noted.

The study -- which also involved the Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha -- was based on a survey of several thousand people who took supplements ranging from 1,000 to 10,000 IU per day. The volunteers also underwent blood tests to determine the levels of vitamin D metabolites circulating in their blood.

Some studies suggest that only 10 percent of people in the United States have the appropriate level of the vitamin D-related form in their blood to prevent disease linked to a deficiency of the vitamin. These people tend to work outdoors, where their vitamin D levels are boosted through sun exposure.

Last year, a National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee announced that 4,000 IU a day of vitamin D appears safe for adults and kids aged 9 and up.

The IOM's recommended minimum daily level is 600 IU, however, and the Institute noted there were preliminary signals that there might be some harms associated with consuming high levels of vitamin D daily, even at amounts under the recommended upper safe limit.

Garland and his colleagues suggested that 4,000 IU a day is a safe level.

"Now that the results of this study are in, it will become common for almost every adult to take 4000 IU/day," Garland predicted in the news release. "This is comfortably under the 10,000 IU/day that the IOM Committee Report considers as the lower limit of risk, and the benefits are substantial."