ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Add your Article

Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip replacements are beneficial and economical for seniors with osteoarthritis, regardless of their age, say researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

Their study, published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, found those who had the surgery were twice as likely as those who didn't to gain mobility and the ability to take care of one's self.

"We found that total hip arthroplasty improves everyday life for patients and is as beneficial to people in their 80s or 90s as it is for someone in their 60s," Linda George, associate director of the Duke Center for the Study of Aging, said in a prepared statement. "While the number of surgeries conducted in the U.S. has increased dramatically over the last decade, fewer than 25 percent of patients who could benefit from the procedure elect to receive it."

Also, the surgery saves the health-care system, because the average $4,000 to $6,000 reimbursement for the procedure costs far less than the long-term expenses of health care for the disabled. Health economists estimate a $50,000 a year savings associated with a disability-free life.

The study is based on data from 131 patients who received total hip replacement compared to data from 257 patients who did not even know they had osteoarthritis. The patients were interviewed three times each year for four years.

Osteoarthritis of the hip is a progressive type of arthritis that affects about 10 million Americans. Associated with aging and obesity, it causes pain, decreased mobility and increased risk of falls and fractures. Hip replacements are performed when medications and physical therapy fail.

As total hip replacement is an invasive treatment with a long rehabilitation period, some physicians don't like to offer the option to patients older than 85, George said, and that is also why some older patients are reluctant to choose it when it is presented.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Duke University, news release, June 16, 2008

Last Updated: June 27, 2008

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