ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Eating your way to Good Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip replacements are beneficial and economical for seniors with osteoarthritis, regardless of their age, say researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

Their study, published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, found those who had the surgery were twice as likely as those who didn't to gain mobility and the ability to take care of one's self.

"We found that total hip arthroplasty improves everyday life for patients and is as beneficial to people in their 80s or 90s as it is for someone in their 60s," Linda George, associate director of the Duke Center for the Study of Aging, said in a prepared statement. "While the number of surgeries conducted in the U.S. has increased dramatically over the last decade, fewer than 25 percent of patients who could benefit from the procedure elect to receive it."

Also, the surgery saves the health-care system, because the average $4,000 to $6,000 reimbursement for the procedure costs far less than the long-term expenses of health care for the disabled. Health economists estimate a $50,000 a year savings associated with a disability-free life.

The study is based on data from 131 patients who received total hip replacement compared to data from 257 patients who did not even know they had osteoarthritis. The patients were interviewed three times each year for four years.

Osteoarthritis of the hip is a progressive type of arthritis that affects about 10 million Americans. Associated with aging and obesity, it causes pain, decreased mobility and increased risk of falls and fractures. Hip replacements are performed when medications and physical therapy fail.

As total hip replacement is an invasive treatment with a long rehabilitation period, some physicians don't like to offer the option to patients older than 85, George said, and that is also why some older patients are reluctant to choose it when it is presented.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Duke University, news release, June 16, 2008

Last Updated: June 27, 2008

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