ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds

(HealthDay News) -- If you love the five-week holiday smorgasbord from Thanksgiving to New Year's, but are already stressing about the added pounds you'll have to sweat off come Jan. 1, help is at hand.

It's possible, say nutrition experts, to enjoy holiday eating and make it to 2010 weighing the same as you do today.

It's all about devising a strategy and thinking about holiday food just a little differently, said Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis, and Julie Redfern, manager of the Nutrition Consult Services at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Both are registered dietitians who shared their best holiday eating tips.

First, have a plan. Ponder it before family dinners and parties, said Redfern. For instance, you may decide before going to a family sit-down dinner that you will fix your plate once and it will include lots of vegetables. About one-fourth of the plate will be protein-rich food and about one-fourth carbs. You will not go back for seconds.

Eat before you go. Starving guests are more apt to load up their plates, so Diekman suggests having a piece of fruit smeared with peanut butter or a small container of yogurt prior to heading out. You can then approach the buffet table more relaxed.

Think ''pick and choose," not ''sample." Picking and choosing is a great strategy, said Redfern, if it involves picking the one dessert or other goodie you love and can't live without. Instead of sampling all three pies at a holiday dinner, decide which one you'll wish you had had, and then go for it, she suggested.

Remember, alcohol is loaded with calories. Start off at a party with seltzer water or sparkling water, then switch to alcoholic beverages. Delaying the alcohol may also make you take in fewer calories from foods, Redfern said. "Once you have alcohol, it lessens your resolve," she said.

Enlist the waiter's help. If your holiday dinner is in a restaurant, focus on your first course of vegetables, salad or soup, and ask the waiter to hold your main course until you finish, Diekman suggested. You may be fuller than you think, and waiting to eat the main course may mean you'll eat less.

Take control as hostess. If you're the holiday host or hostess, you have a lot of work -- but also enjoy control. Take advantage of that, Diekman said. "Prepare or serve [ready-make] broth-based soups that are packed with vegetables as a first course," she said. "Switch from buffets to meals served by the course to pace eating," she said. It's probable you'll eat less overall that way.

If you love gravy, make it from fat-free broth. Include more casserole dishes -- you can increase the vegetables with hardly anyone noticing.

Move, even a little. Squeezing in a little exercise, no matter how hectic the schedule, will help, Diekman said. "Walk the mall before you can spend any money," she suggested. "After spending a predetermined amount, take another mall walk."

Take a 10-minute walk every day, she said. "Everyone has that time."

Defend your resolve. Even with the best strategies in play, some people fall apart when face-to-face with those ubiquitous food pushers -- those holiday hosts and hostesses who encourage you to eat, eat, eat.

You can resist them, Redfern said. "Start off with a compliment," she said. Something like: "I love your pie, but I am full."

This works much better, she said, than telling them you have to cut back. That's an invitation for them to come back with tough-to-resist lines such as "Oh, it's only one day," or "You can afford it."

If you still experience resistance, tell your hostess: "I'd love to take some home for later." Redfern added: "They don't need to know if you actually eat it."

But if you don't want that temptation -- the pumpkin pie calling from the kitchen at midnight -- learn to be firm and repetitive as a guest, Redfern said.

''It almost takes three times for them to get the message," she said. So, repeat, repeat, repeat, cheerfully but firmly.

More information

SOURCES: Julie Redfern, R.D, manager, Nutrition Consult Services, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston; Connie Diekman, R.D., director, university nutrition, Washington University, St. Louis Published on: November 25, 2009