ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
CANCER
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
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Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds

(HealthDay News) -- If you love the five-week holiday smorgasbord from Thanksgiving to New Year's, but are already stressing about the added pounds you'll have to sweat off come Jan. 1, help is at hand.

It's possible, say nutrition experts, to enjoy holiday eating and make it to 2010 weighing the same as you do today.

It's all about devising a strategy and thinking about holiday food just a little differently, said Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis, and Julie Redfern, manager of the Nutrition Consult Services at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Both are registered dietitians who shared their best holiday eating tips.

First, have a plan. Ponder it before family dinners and parties, said Redfern. For instance, you may decide before going to a family sit-down dinner that you will fix your plate once and it will include lots of vegetables. About one-fourth of the plate will be protein-rich food and about one-fourth carbs. You will not go back for seconds.

Eat before you go. Starving guests are more apt to load up their plates, so Diekman suggests having a piece of fruit smeared with peanut butter or a small container of yogurt prior to heading out. You can then approach the buffet table more relaxed.

Think ''pick and choose," not ''sample." Picking and choosing is a great strategy, said Redfern, if it involves picking the one dessert or other goodie you love and can't live without. Instead of sampling all three pies at a holiday dinner, decide which one you'll wish you had had, and then go for it, she suggested.

Remember, alcohol is loaded with calories. Start off at a party with seltzer water or sparkling water, then switch to alcoholic beverages. Delaying the alcohol may also make you take in fewer calories from foods, Redfern said. "Once you have alcohol, it lessens your resolve," she said.

Enlist the waiter's help. If your holiday dinner is in a restaurant, focus on your first course of vegetables, salad or soup, and ask the waiter to hold your main course until you finish, Diekman suggested. You may be fuller than you think, and waiting to eat the main course may mean you'll eat less.

Take control as hostess. If you're the holiday host or hostess, you have a lot of work -- but also enjoy control. Take advantage of that, Diekman said. "Prepare or serve [ready-make] broth-based soups that are packed with vegetables as a first course," she said. "Switch from buffets to meals served by the course to pace eating," she said. It's probable you'll eat less overall that way.

If you love gravy, make it from fat-free broth. Include more casserole dishes -- you can increase the vegetables with hardly anyone noticing.

Move, even a little. Squeezing in a little exercise, no matter how hectic the schedule, will help, Diekman said. "Walk the mall before you can spend any money," she suggested. "After spending a predetermined amount, take another mall walk."

Take a 10-minute walk every day, she said. "Everyone has that time."

Defend your resolve. Even with the best strategies in play, some people fall apart when face-to-face with those ubiquitous food pushers -- those holiday hosts and hostesses who encourage you to eat, eat, eat.

You can resist them, Redfern said. "Start off with a compliment," she said. Something like: "I love your pie, but I am full."

This works much better, she said, than telling them you have to cut back. That's an invitation for them to come back with tough-to-resist lines such as "Oh, it's only one day," or "You can afford it."

If you still experience resistance, tell your hostess: "I'd love to take some home for later." Redfern added: "They don't need to know if you actually eat it."

But if you don't want that temptation -- the pumpkin pie calling from the kitchen at midnight -- learn to be firm and repetitive as a guest, Redfern said.

''It almost takes three times for them to get the message," she said. So, repeat, repeat, repeat, cheerfully but firmly.

More information

SOURCES: Julie Redfern, R.D, manager, Nutrition Consult Services, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston; Connie Diekman, R.D., director, university nutrition, Washington University, St. Louis Published on: November 25, 2009