ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
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Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Home renovations, repairs and painting can lead to elevated lead levels in children and are changing the dynamics of lead-poisoning risk among children, according to a new U.S. study.

Previously, poor and minority children were at higher risk for lead poisoning than white children. Much of those disparities have been reduced after more than two decades of efforts to control and eliminate lead paint hazards in multi-family rental units in cities, the report said.

Now, however, an increasing number of more affluent families and their children are being exposed to lead through home renovations, repairs and painting.

No level of lead is considered safe. Blood lead levels (BLLs) of more than 10 ug/dL are associated with behavioral and developmental problems. Environmental and medical intervention is recommended when a child's BLL is more than 20 ug/dL, according to the study.

A 1993-94 assessment of lead exposure sources in New York state -- excluding New York City -- found that home renovations, repairs and painting were major sources of lead exposure among children with blood lead levels of more than 20 ug/dL.

This prompted local health departments in the state to routinely gather information about renovation-repair-painting activities when investigating children's homes for lead sources.

In 1993-94, renovation-repair-painting (RRP) activities were found in 320 of the 4,608 (6.9 percent) of cases where children's blood lead levels were more than 20 ug/dL. But by 2006-07, renovation-repair-painting activities were found in 139 of 972 such cases, or 14 percent.

"RRP activities continued to be an important source of lead exposure during 2006-2007," the study authors wrote. "Children living in housing built before 1978 (when lead-based paint was banned from residential use) that are undergoing RRP activities should be considered at high risk for elevated BLLs (blood lead levels), and appropriate precautions should be taken to prevent exposure."

The study was published in the Jan. 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

More information

The CDC has more about childhood lead exposure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Jan. 29, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2009

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