ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
CANCER
Get to Know the Pap Test
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Home renovations, repairs and painting can lead to elevated lead levels in children and are changing the dynamics of lead-poisoning risk among children, according to a new U.S. study.

Previously, poor and minority children were at higher risk for lead poisoning than white children. Much of those disparities have been reduced after more than two decades of efforts to control and eliminate lead paint hazards in multi-family rental units in cities, the report said.

Now, however, an increasing number of more affluent families and their children are being exposed to lead through home renovations, repairs and painting.

No level of lead is considered safe. Blood lead levels (BLLs) of more than 10 ug/dL are associated with behavioral and developmental problems. Environmental and medical intervention is recommended when a child's BLL is more than 20 ug/dL, according to the study.

A 1993-94 assessment of lead exposure sources in New York state -- excluding New York City -- found that home renovations, repairs and painting were major sources of lead exposure among children with blood lead levels of more than 20 ug/dL.

This prompted local health departments in the state to routinely gather information about renovation-repair-painting activities when investigating children's homes for lead sources.

In 1993-94, renovation-repair-painting (RRP) activities were found in 320 of the 4,608 (6.9 percent) of cases where children's blood lead levels were more than 20 ug/dL. But by 2006-07, renovation-repair-painting activities were found in 139 of 972 such cases, or 14 percent.

"RRP activities continued to be an important source of lead exposure during 2006-2007," the study authors wrote. "Children living in housing built before 1978 (when lead-based paint was banned from residential use) that are undergoing RRP activities should be considered at high risk for elevated BLLs (blood lead levels), and appropriate precautions should be taken to prevent exposure."

The study was published in the Jan. 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

More information

The CDC has more about childhood lead exposure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Jan. 29, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2009

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