ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
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Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Home renovations, repairs and painting can lead to elevated lead levels in children and are changing the dynamics of lead-poisoning risk among children, according to a new U.S. study.

Previously, poor and minority children were at higher risk for lead poisoning than white children. Much of those disparities have been reduced after more than two decades of efforts to control and eliminate lead paint hazards in multi-family rental units in cities, the report said.

Now, however, an increasing number of more affluent families and their children are being exposed to lead through home renovations, repairs and painting.

No level of lead is considered safe. Blood lead levels (BLLs) of more than 10 ug/dL are associated with behavioral and developmental problems. Environmental and medical intervention is recommended when a child's BLL is more than 20 ug/dL, according to the study.

A 1993-94 assessment of lead exposure sources in New York state -- excluding New York City -- found that home renovations, repairs and painting were major sources of lead exposure among children with blood lead levels of more than 20 ug/dL.

This prompted local health departments in the state to routinely gather information about renovation-repair-painting activities when investigating children's homes for lead sources.

In 1993-94, renovation-repair-painting (RRP) activities were found in 320 of the 4,608 (6.9 percent) of cases where children's blood lead levels were more than 20 ug/dL. But by 2006-07, renovation-repair-painting activities were found in 139 of 972 such cases, or 14 percent.

"RRP activities continued to be an important source of lead exposure during 2006-2007," the study authors wrote. "Children living in housing built before 1978 (when lead-based paint was banned from residential use) that are undergoing RRP activities should be considered at high risk for elevated BLLs (blood lead levels), and appropriate precautions should be taken to prevent exposure."

The study was published in the Jan. 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

More information

The CDC has more about childhood lead exposure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Jan. 29, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2009

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