ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
CANCER
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Laugh and the World Understands
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
The Unmedicated Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Add your Article

Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates

FRIDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women can blame those extra cavities on their hormones, a new study suggests.

A comprehensive review of dental records in prehistoric and current human populations found that women have more dental health issues than men because of reproduction and fertility issues linked to female-specific hormones.

Previous studies have tied a change in food production by agrarian societies and gender-specific behavioral factors, such as division of labor and dietary preference, to an increase in cavities among women. However, in the October issue of Current Anthropology, John R. Lukacs, of the University of Oregon, pointed more directly at internal as well as external causes.

"I argue that the rise of agriculture increased demands on women's reproductive systems, contributing to an increase in fertility that intensified the negative impact of dietary change on women's oral health. The combined impacts of increased fertility, dietary changes and division of labor during the move into agricultural societies contributed to the widespread gender differential observed in dental caries rates today," Lukacs, a professor of anthropology who specializes in dental, skeletal and nutritional issues, said in a university news release.

He pointed to three main changes leading to women's higher rates of cavities:

* Female sex hormones. Citing his own research, along with a 1954 animal study that found that female estrogens, but not male androgens, were correlated to cavity rates, he said the cumulative effect of estrogens, including fluctuations at puberty and high levels during pregnancy, promote cavities and dietary changes.
* Saliva. Women produce less saliva than men, reducing the removal of food residue from the teeth. During pregnancy, the chemical composition changes, reducing saliva's antimicrobial capacity.
* Food cravings, immune response and aversions during pregnancy. Women often crave high-energy, sweet foods during the third trimester, as well as an aversion to meat in first trimesters.

Yet, Lukacs wrote, it is still not fully understood how these all contribute to a higher risk of cavities in women as they age.

"If hormonal and physiological factors work in an independent or additive manner, their impact on women's oral health could be significant. The fact that women's caries experience increases with age at a greater rate than men's in diverse ethnic groups from different ecological and cultural settings supports this interpretation," he said.

More information

The American Dental Association has more about pregnancy and dental health.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Oregon, news release, Oct. 14, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2008

Copyright © 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com