ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Maximize Your Run
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Add your Article

Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Looking at the number of cancer surgeries performed at a hospital to determine where patients will receive the best care is a useful, but imperfect, method, say Australian researchers who reviewed 101 studies on hospital case volume and patient outcomes.

The studies included more than 1 million patients with esophageal, gastric, hepatic, pancreatic, colon or rectal cancer.

The review authors found a significant association between hospital case volume and death risk for five of the six cancer types. Overall, each doubling of hospital case volume decreased the risk of perioperative (around the time of surgery) death by more than 10 percent.

Between 10 and 50 patients per year, depending on the cancer type, need to be moved from a low-volume to a high-volume hospital to prevent one additional volume-associated perioperative death, calculated the researchers at the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital.

However, the review authors noted that about one-third of the studies failed to find a significant link between hospital volume and death risk. They added that a lack of consistent results from individual studies calls into question the validity of using hospital volume to measure quality of care.

"On the basis of mortality outcomes alone, it appears prudent to support volume-based referral and high-volume centers," the researchers wrote.

However, a surgeon's individual case volume may also affect patient outcomes. For example, a large hospital where many surgeons each perform a small number of operations may have a higher death rate than a small hospital where one or two surgeons do only one type of operation.

The review authors concluded that there are "clearly some low-volume providers who get good results, and therefore referral to relatively low-volume providers should be supported if good outcomes can be demonstrated by process measures or by risk-adjusted outcomes, especially if there are compelling personal or medical reasons for the patient to be treated close to home."

The review appears in the current issue of CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about cancer surgery.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Cancer Society, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 04, 2009

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