ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Sleep and Do Better
Eat Light - Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Looking at the number of cancer surgeries performed at a hospital to determine where patients will receive the best care is a useful, but imperfect, method, say Australian researchers who reviewed 101 studies on hospital case volume and patient outcomes.

The studies included more than 1 million patients with esophageal, gastric, hepatic, pancreatic, colon or rectal cancer.

The review authors found a significant association between hospital case volume and death risk for five of the six cancer types. Overall, each doubling of hospital case volume decreased the risk of perioperative (around the time of surgery) death by more than 10 percent.

Between 10 and 50 patients per year, depending on the cancer type, need to be moved from a low-volume to a high-volume hospital to prevent one additional volume-associated perioperative death, calculated the researchers at the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital.

However, the review authors noted that about one-third of the studies failed to find a significant link between hospital volume and death risk. They added that a lack of consistent results from individual studies calls into question the validity of using hospital volume to measure quality of care.

"On the basis of mortality outcomes alone, it appears prudent to support volume-based referral and high-volume centers," the researchers wrote.

However, a surgeon's individual case volume may also affect patient outcomes. For example, a large hospital where many surgeons each perform a small number of operations may have a higher death rate than a small hospital where one or two surgeons do only one type of operation.

The review authors concluded that there are "clearly some low-volume providers who get good results, and therefore referral to relatively low-volume providers should be supported if good outcomes can be demonstrated by process measures or by risk-adjusted outcomes, especially if there are compelling personal or medical reasons for the patient to be treated close to home."

The review appears in the current issue of CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about cancer surgery.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Cancer Society, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 04, 2009

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