ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Looking at the number of cancer surgeries performed at a hospital to determine where patients will receive the best care is a useful, but imperfect, method, say Australian researchers who reviewed 101 studies on hospital case volume and patient outcomes.

The studies included more than 1 million patients with esophageal, gastric, hepatic, pancreatic, colon or rectal cancer.

The review authors found a significant association between hospital case volume and death risk for five of the six cancer types. Overall, each doubling of hospital case volume decreased the risk of perioperative (around the time of surgery) death by more than 10 percent.

Between 10 and 50 patients per year, depending on the cancer type, need to be moved from a low-volume to a high-volume hospital to prevent one additional volume-associated perioperative death, calculated the researchers at the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital.

However, the review authors noted that about one-third of the studies failed to find a significant link between hospital volume and death risk. They added that a lack of consistent results from individual studies calls into question the validity of using hospital volume to measure quality of care.

"On the basis of mortality outcomes alone, it appears prudent to support volume-based referral and high-volume centers," the researchers wrote.

However, a surgeon's individual case volume may also affect patient outcomes. For example, a large hospital where many surgeons each perform a small number of operations may have a higher death rate than a small hospital where one or two surgeons do only one type of operation.

The review authors concluded that there are "clearly some low-volume providers who get good results, and therefore referral to relatively low-volume providers should be supported if good outcomes can be demonstrated by process measures or by risk-adjusted outcomes, especially if there are compelling personal or medical reasons for the patient to be treated close to home."

The review appears in the current issue of CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about cancer surgery.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Cancer Society, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 04, 2009

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