ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
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Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels

(HealthDay News) -- Chemicals used in food packaging, paper and textile coatings may affect blood cholesterol levels in people, U.S. researchers have found.

Previous studies have found that polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) are present in the bodies of most people. In this new study, a team at the Boston University School of Public Health analyzed the association between serum cholesterol levels and four PFCs: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), and perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS).

The analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed that people with levels of PFOS, PFOA and PFNA in the top 25 percent had higher total and non-HDL cholesterol (primarily the "bad" LDL cholesterol) than those with levels in the lowest 25 percent.

The association was most noticeable for PFNA, with a 13.9 milligram per deciliter difference in estimated cholesterol levels between people with the highest and lowest levels of the chemical, the study authors noted.

The researchers found little evidence of a link between PFC levels and body size or insulin resistance, according to the report in the Nov. 2 issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

"Though these results are based on cross-sectional data and are exploratory, they are consistent with much of the human epidemiologic literature and indicate that polyfluoroalkyl chemicals may be exerting an effect on cholesterol at environmentally relevant exposures," wrote first author Jessica Nelson and colleagues. "Our study affirms the importance of investigating polyfluoroalkyl chemicals other than PFOS and PFOA, particularly as industrial uses of PFOS and PFOA decline and other polyfluoroalkyl chemicals are substituted."

SOURCES: Environmental Health Perspectives, news release, Nov. 2, 2009