ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
The Unmedicated Mind
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
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Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels

(HealthDay News) -- Chemicals used in food packaging, paper and textile coatings may affect blood cholesterol levels in people, U.S. researchers have found.

Previous studies have found that polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) are present in the bodies of most people. In this new study, a team at the Boston University School of Public Health analyzed the association between serum cholesterol levels and four PFCs: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), and perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS).

The analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed that people with levels of PFOS, PFOA and PFNA in the top 25 percent had higher total and non-HDL cholesterol (primarily the "bad" LDL cholesterol) than those with levels in the lowest 25 percent.

The association was most noticeable for PFNA, with a 13.9 milligram per deciliter difference in estimated cholesterol levels between people with the highest and lowest levels of the chemical, the study authors noted.

The researchers found little evidence of a link between PFC levels and body size or insulin resistance, according to the report in the Nov. 2 issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

"Though these results are based on cross-sectional data and are exploratory, they are consistent with much of the human epidemiologic literature and indicate that polyfluoroalkyl chemicals may be exerting an effect on cholesterol at environmentally relevant exposures," wrote first author Jessica Nelson and colleagues. "Our study affirms the importance of investigating polyfluoroalkyl chemicals other than PFOS and PFOA, particularly as industrial uses of PFOS and PFOA decline and other polyfluoroalkyl chemicals are substituted."

SOURCES: Environmental Health Perspectives, news release, Nov. 2, 2009