ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches

SUNDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- With Tropical Storm Hanna having bruised much of the U.S. East Coast, and the far more dangerous Hurricane Ike hot on her heels, federal officials are offering checklists of advice for people living in the paths of violent Atlantic storms.

Before-the-storm tips, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, include:

* If evacuating, pack an emergency supply kit with food, bottled water, prescription medicines, and important documents.
* If you plan to drive, fill your gas tank as soon as possible.
* Turn off gas, electricity, and water, and disconnect appliances before leaving.
* Take steps to ensure your pets' safety during the storm.
* Follow designated evacuation routes for your area, and expect heavy traffic.

If you plan to stay home during the storm:

* Pack an emergency supply kit with necessities such as food, bottled water, and prescription medicines to last from three to five days.
* Determine the best escape routes from your home, and make sure that everyone in your house is able to follow the escape plan.
* Look for escape routes from upper levels of the house, in case of flooding.
* Don't go outside, even if the weather seems calm. Wait for local authorities to tell you it is safe to go outside.
* If your home is flooded or damaged, move to a neighbor's or a local shelter.

After the storm:

* Don't drive through flooded roads, since cars can be swept away or lose power.
* Never touch a downed power line or anything in contact with one.
* Turn off electrical power when there are hazards around your home such as standing water, fallen power lines, or gas leaks.
* Listen to announcements in the local media (radio, television or newspaper) to find out if it's safe to use tap water, and follow instructions regarding water.
* If you aren't sure if water is safe to use, boil water before you use it for anything, including brushing teeth, cooking, drinking, or bathing.
* Throw away any food that may have been touched by floodwater.
* Use battery-powered lanterns and flashlights, instead of candles, to prevent fires.
* Stoves, generators, lanterns, and gas ranges release dangerous carbon monoxide gas and should always be used outdoors, far away from windows, doors and vents.

More information

To learn more, visit the CDC.



-- HealthDay staff



SOURCE: Sept. 5, 2008, news release, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta

Last Updated: Sept. 07, 2008

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