ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Football Can Shrink Players
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Add your Article

Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches

SUNDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- With Tropical Storm Hanna having bruised much of the U.S. East Coast, and the far more dangerous Hurricane Ike hot on her heels, federal officials are offering checklists of advice for people living in the paths of violent Atlantic storms.

Before-the-storm tips, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, include:

* If evacuating, pack an emergency supply kit with food, bottled water, prescription medicines, and important documents.
* If you plan to drive, fill your gas tank as soon as possible.
* Turn off gas, electricity, and water, and disconnect appliances before leaving.
* Take steps to ensure your pets' safety during the storm.
* Follow designated evacuation routes for your area, and expect heavy traffic.

If you plan to stay home during the storm:

* Pack an emergency supply kit with necessities such as food, bottled water, and prescription medicines to last from three to five days.
* Determine the best escape routes from your home, and make sure that everyone in your house is able to follow the escape plan.
* Look for escape routes from upper levels of the house, in case of flooding.
* Don't go outside, even if the weather seems calm. Wait for local authorities to tell you it is safe to go outside.
* If your home is flooded or damaged, move to a neighbor's or a local shelter.

After the storm:

* Don't drive through flooded roads, since cars can be swept away or lose power.
* Never touch a downed power line or anything in contact with one.
* Turn off electrical power when there are hazards around your home such as standing water, fallen power lines, or gas leaks.
* Listen to announcements in the local media (radio, television or newspaper) to find out if it's safe to use tap water, and follow instructions regarding water.
* If you aren't sure if water is safe to use, boil water before you use it for anything, including brushing teeth, cooking, drinking, or bathing.
* Throw away any food that may have been touched by floodwater.
* Use battery-powered lanterns and flashlights, instead of candles, to prevent fires.
* Stoves, generators, lanterns, and gas ranges release dangerous carbon monoxide gas and should always be used outdoors, far away from windows, doors and vents.

More information

To learn more, visit the CDC.



-- HealthDay staff



SOURCE: Sept. 5, 2008, news release, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta

Last Updated: Sept. 07, 2008

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