ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Young black American men have higher central blood pressure and stiffer blood vessels than white males, indicating that black men are developing high blood pressure at an early age and with little outward signs, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

The findings suggest that measuring central blood pressure (the pressure in the aorta -- the main artery leaving the heart) may be more valuable than measuring brachial blood pressure (on the arm) when assessing black men for hypertension.

"Central blood pressure holds greater prognostic value than conventional brachial blood pressure as central pressure more aptly reflects the load encountered by the heart," the researchers wrote. "Thus brachial blood pressure may neglect important information on cardiovascular burden and response to therapy in African-American men."

The study included 25 black men and 30 white men, average age 23. Both groups had similar results on a variety of measures, including heart rate, cardiorespiratory fitness, body mass index, body fat, blood lipids and glucose levels. They also had similar brachial blood pressure, but the black men had significantly higher central blood pressure.

The black males also showed early signs of vascular damage that can lead to hypertension, including stiffer arteries throughout the body and thicker carotid (neck) arteries, something that's usually found in older people and is associated with atherosclerosis.

"Although having a similar cardiovascular risk factor profile as young white men, diffuse macrovascular and microvascular dysfunction is present at a young age in apparently healthy African-American men," the researchers wrote. "Values seen are comparable to values often reported in older individuals or individuals with more advanced hypertensive disease."

The researchers didn't examine why this occurs in young, fit black men, but suggested environmental factors, such as diet, may play a role.

The study was published online in the American Journal of Physiology -- Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about high blood pressure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The American Physiological Society, news release, Nov. 17, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 24, 2008

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