ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating your way to Good Health
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Young black American men have higher central blood pressure and stiffer blood vessels than white males, indicating that black men are developing high blood pressure at an early age and with little outward signs, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

The findings suggest that measuring central blood pressure (the pressure in the aorta -- the main artery leaving the heart) may be more valuable than measuring brachial blood pressure (on the arm) when assessing black men for hypertension.

"Central blood pressure holds greater prognostic value than conventional brachial blood pressure as central pressure more aptly reflects the load encountered by the heart," the researchers wrote. "Thus brachial blood pressure may neglect important information on cardiovascular burden and response to therapy in African-American men."

The study included 25 black men and 30 white men, average age 23. Both groups had similar results on a variety of measures, including heart rate, cardiorespiratory fitness, body mass index, body fat, blood lipids and glucose levels. They also had similar brachial blood pressure, but the black men had significantly higher central blood pressure.

The black males also showed early signs of vascular damage that can lead to hypertension, including stiffer arteries throughout the body and thicker carotid (neck) arteries, something that's usually found in older people and is associated with atherosclerosis.

"Although having a similar cardiovascular risk factor profile as young white men, diffuse macrovascular and microvascular dysfunction is present at a young age in apparently healthy African-American men," the researchers wrote. "Values seen are comparable to values often reported in older individuals or individuals with more advanced hypertensive disease."

The researchers didn't examine why this occurs in young, fit black men, but suggested environmental factors, such as diet, may play a role.

The study was published online in the American Journal of Physiology -- Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about high blood pressure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The American Physiological Society, news release, Nov. 17, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 24, 2008

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