ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Men over 40 may want to avoid iced tea and start hitting the lemonade if they wish to lower their risk of kidney stones, according to experts.

Kidney stones, crystals that develop in the kidneys or the tubes that carry urine from the kidney to the bladder, affect 10 percent of the U.S. population, and men run a four times greater risk than women of developing them. The chance of forming kidney stones rises steeply after the age of 40.

Oxalate, a key chemical in the formation of kidney stones, comes in high concentrations in iced tea.

"For many people, iced tea is potentially one of the worst things they can drink," John Milner, an instructor in the department of urology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said in a news release. "For people who have a tendency to form kidney stones, it's definitely one of the worst things you can drink."

The failure to stay hydrated is a common cause of kidney stones. Summertime heat and humidity, which causes excessively sweating and dehydration, combined with an marked increase in iced tea consumption in the United States, raises the risk of kidney stones during this time of year.

The Tea Association of the U.S.A. reports that Americans consume almost 1.91 billon gallons of iced teas a year, a dramatic rise given the belief that the beverage is healthier than other alternatives such as soda and beer.

Milner said drinking water is the best way to stay properly hydrated. If one is prone to developing kidney stones, though, flavoring water heavily with lemon or drinking lemonade may help.

"Lemons are very high in citrates, which inhibit the growth of kidney stones," Milner said. "Lemonade, not the powdered variety that uses artificial flavoring, actually slows the development of kidney stones for those who are prone to the development of kidney stones."

Other foods containing high concentrations of oxalates that people prone to kidney stones should avoid include spinach, chocolate, rhubarb and nuts. Going light on salt consumption, reducing the amount of meat consumed, drinking several glasses a water a day, and eating foods high in calcium, which counteract any oxalates the body absorbs, also helps.

More information

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse has more about kidney stones.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Loyola University Health System, news release, July 22, 2008

Last Updated: July 25, 2008

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