ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
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Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study

TUESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- The erectile dysfunction drugs Cialis (tadalafil) and Viagra (sildenafil) didn't appear to damage vision in men who took the medications daily for six months, according to a drug company study.

These drugs, called selective phodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, treat erectile dysfunction by interfering with the action of the compound PDE5 in the blood vessels of the penis. But there are concerns that PDE5 inhibitors may also act on similar compounds in the retina, the part of the eye that receives and transmits images to the brain, according to background information in the study.

Men taking PDE5 inhibitors have reported mild and temporary blurred vision, altered light perception, and blue-tinged vision.

This Eli Lilly study included 244 men, ages 30 to 65, who were randomly selected to take either 5 milligrams of tadalafil, 50 mg. of sildenafil, or a placebo daily for six months. The men underwent thorough eye tests before, during and after treatment.

By the end of the study, the researchers found no significant differences in vision between the men who took the drugs and those who took the placebo. The findings were published in the April issue of the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

"There are several reasons ophthalmologists need to be acquainted with the pharmacologic profiles of PDE5 inhibitors and their potential side effects," the authors wrote "The frequency of erectile dysfunction, which is a form of peripheral vascular disease that impairs men's abilities to achieve and maintain an erection, increases dramatically with age and in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, many men who take PDE5 inhibitors to treat their erectile dysfunction will also be followed up by ophthalmologists for ocular disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and ocular vascular disease."

"Furthermore, PDE5 inhibitors can exert direct effects on the retina, and such effects probably account for many of the visual side effects such as blue-tinged vision and light sensitivity that have been reported," they concluded.

But they said their "results indicate that there is no cumulative damage or effect of clinical significance for either 5 milligrams of tadalafil or 50 milligrams of sildenafil taken daily for six months."

More information

The American Urological Association has more about erectile dysfunction.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, April 13, 2009

Last Updated: April 14, 2009

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