ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Eating your way to Good Health
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip replacements that use cement-less components can last 20 years -- twice as long as previous versions, a new study has found.

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that only five of the 124 cement-less metal Harris-Galante implants used to replace the bone that fits into the hip socket had failed over two decades in the patients under review, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Early versions of hip implants used a special cement to help secure the replacement joint to the patient's bones, but these failed more often, especially after 10 years' use. Instead of cement, the new implants use a porous material to which bone can fuse to create a stronger, longer-lasting bond.

"Our results confirm earlier work done at Rush and at other institutions: that cement-less acetabular components work very well and that long-term biological fixation can be obtained," study author Dr. Craig Della Valle, an orthopedic surgeon at Rush, said in a news release.

The findings are good news for active, younger people who require hip replacements.

The study followed patients who received hip replacements at Rush over the past two decades and found few of the new implants failed to the point that further replacement surgery was needed. However, the team did note that a fifth of the patients experienced enough wear and tear on the plastic lining of the implant's metal shell that further, though less invasive, surgery was required or recommended.

"The average age of the patients in this study was 52 years, much younger than most patients who underwent hip replacements at the time. So the high rate of wear-related complications was not completely unexpected," study co-author Jorge Galante, former chairman of orthopedics at Rush and one of the developers of the implant, said in the same news release.

Some patients also required some surgical intervention to correct osteolysis -- bone resorption resulting from the wear and corrosion of the metal implants, but this may be less of an issue in the future because new versions use more wear-resistant bearing surfaces, Della Valle said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about joint replacement.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Rush University Medical Center, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com