ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
The Food Irradiation Story
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Add your Article

Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip replacements that use cement-less components can last 20 years -- twice as long as previous versions, a new study has found.

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that only five of the 124 cement-less metal Harris-Galante implants used to replace the bone that fits into the hip socket had failed over two decades in the patients under review, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Early versions of hip implants used a special cement to help secure the replacement joint to the patient's bones, but these failed more often, especially after 10 years' use. Instead of cement, the new implants use a porous material to which bone can fuse to create a stronger, longer-lasting bond.

"Our results confirm earlier work done at Rush and at other institutions: that cement-less acetabular components work very well and that long-term biological fixation can be obtained," study author Dr. Craig Della Valle, an orthopedic surgeon at Rush, said in a news release.

The findings are good news for active, younger people who require hip replacements.

The study followed patients who received hip replacements at Rush over the past two decades and found few of the new implants failed to the point that further replacement surgery was needed. However, the team did note that a fifth of the patients experienced enough wear and tear on the plastic lining of the implant's metal shell that further, though less invasive, surgery was required or recommended.

"The average age of the patients in this study was 52 years, much younger than most patients who underwent hip replacements at the time. So the high rate of wear-related complications was not completely unexpected," study co-author Jorge Galante, former chairman of orthopedics at Rush and one of the developers of the implant, said in the same news release.

Some patients also required some surgical intervention to correct osteolysis -- bone resorption resulting from the wear and corrosion of the metal implants, but this may be less of an issue in the future because new versions use more wear-resistant bearing surfaces, Della Valle said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about joint replacement.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Rush University Medical Center, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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