ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Add your Article

Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip replacements that use cement-less components can last 20 years -- twice as long as previous versions, a new study has found.

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that only five of the 124 cement-less metal Harris-Galante implants used to replace the bone that fits into the hip socket had failed over two decades in the patients under review, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Early versions of hip implants used a special cement to help secure the replacement joint to the patient's bones, but these failed more often, especially after 10 years' use. Instead of cement, the new implants use a porous material to which bone can fuse to create a stronger, longer-lasting bond.

"Our results confirm earlier work done at Rush and at other institutions: that cement-less acetabular components work very well and that long-term biological fixation can be obtained," study author Dr. Craig Della Valle, an orthopedic surgeon at Rush, said in a news release.

The findings are good news for active, younger people who require hip replacements.

The study followed patients who received hip replacements at Rush over the past two decades and found few of the new implants failed to the point that further replacement surgery was needed. However, the team did note that a fifth of the patients experienced enough wear and tear on the plastic lining of the implant's metal shell that further, though less invasive, surgery was required or recommended.

"The average age of the patients in this study was 52 years, much younger than most patients who underwent hip replacements at the time. So the high rate of wear-related complications was not completely unexpected," study co-author Jorge Galante, former chairman of orthopedics at Rush and one of the developers of the implant, said in the same news release.

Some patients also required some surgical intervention to correct osteolysis -- bone resorption resulting from the wear and corrosion of the metal implants, but this may be less of an issue in the future because new versions use more wear-resistant bearing surfaces, Della Valle said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about joint replacement.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Rush University Medical Center, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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