ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Add your Article

Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip replacements that use cement-less components can last 20 years -- twice as long as previous versions, a new study has found.

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that only five of the 124 cement-less metal Harris-Galante implants used to replace the bone that fits into the hip socket had failed over two decades in the patients under review, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Early versions of hip implants used a special cement to help secure the replacement joint to the patient's bones, but these failed more often, especially after 10 years' use. Instead of cement, the new implants use a porous material to which bone can fuse to create a stronger, longer-lasting bond.

"Our results confirm earlier work done at Rush and at other institutions: that cement-less acetabular components work very well and that long-term biological fixation can be obtained," study author Dr. Craig Della Valle, an orthopedic surgeon at Rush, said in a news release.

The findings are good news for active, younger people who require hip replacements.

The study followed patients who received hip replacements at Rush over the past two decades and found few of the new implants failed to the point that further replacement surgery was needed. However, the team did note that a fifth of the patients experienced enough wear and tear on the plastic lining of the implant's metal shell that further, though less invasive, surgery was required or recommended.

"The average age of the patients in this study was 52 years, much younger than most patients who underwent hip replacements at the time. So the high rate of wear-related complications was not completely unexpected," study co-author Jorge Galante, former chairman of orthopedics at Rush and one of the developers of the implant, said in the same news release.

Some patients also required some surgical intervention to correct osteolysis -- bone resorption resulting from the wear and corrosion of the metal implants, but this may be less of an issue in the future because new versions use more wear-resistant bearing surfaces, Della Valle said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about joint replacement.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Rush University Medical Center, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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