ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Raw Food Diet
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks

MONDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who suffer a broken upper arm are five times more likely than normal to break a hip within a year after the arm fracture, a finding from a new study that might help in efforts to prevent both types of fractures.

"There have been studies in the past showing a relationship between upper arm fractures and hip fractures, but we wanted to determine when that risk is greatest," Dr. Jeremiah Clinton, an orthopedic surgeon and associate professor of orthopedics at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in an American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons news release. "By recognizing when that period of increased risk occurs, physicians have a window of opportunity to take steps that may possibly prevent a subsequent fracture."

The study was published in the March issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

The exact relationship between arm and hip fractures isn't clear, but "there is evidence to support that both fractures stem from similar reactions to a fall," Clinton said. "When patients age, their reflexes slow down, and they may not have the time or ability to correctly position themselves as they fall. Rather than trying to catch themselves as a younger person would do, studies show that elderly people have a tendency to simply tuck and roll, which causes greater force on the shoulder and hip."

Causes of falls among elderly people include: effects of medications, neurological disorders, loss of an ability to maintain balance and decreased reaction time.

"One of the first steps a patient should take following a fall is to talk with their orthopedist and other physicians to determine the cause," Clinton said. "Once the cause is more clearly understood, the proper steps can be taken to decrease a patient's risk of having another fall and potentially future fractures."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about falls and fractures.
SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 02, 2009

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