ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks

MONDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who suffer a broken upper arm are five times more likely than normal to break a hip within a year after the arm fracture, a finding from a new study that might help in efforts to prevent both types of fractures.

"There have been studies in the past showing a relationship between upper arm fractures and hip fractures, but we wanted to determine when that risk is greatest," Dr. Jeremiah Clinton, an orthopedic surgeon and associate professor of orthopedics at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in an American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons news release. "By recognizing when that period of increased risk occurs, physicians have a window of opportunity to take steps that may possibly prevent a subsequent fracture."

The study was published in the March issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

The exact relationship between arm and hip fractures isn't clear, but "there is evidence to support that both fractures stem from similar reactions to a fall," Clinton said. "When patients age, their reflexes slow down, and they may not have the time or ability to correctly position themselves as they fall. Rather than trying to catch themselves as a younger person would do, studies show that elderly people have a tendency to simply tuck and roll, which causes greater force on the shoulder and hip."

Causes of falls among elderly people include: effects of medications, neurological disorders, loss of an ability to maintain balance and decreased reaction time.

"One of the first steps a patient should take following a fall is to talk with their orthopedist and other physicians to determine the cause," Clinton said. "Once the cause is more clearly understood, the proper steps can be taken to decrease a patient's risk of having another fall and potentially future fractures."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about falls and fractures.
SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 02, 2009

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