ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks

MONDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who suffer a broken upper arm are five times more likely than normal to break a hip within a year after the arm fracture, a finding from a new study that might help in efforts to prevent both types of fractures.

"There have been studies in the past showing a relationship between upper arm fractures and hip fractures, but we wanted to determine when that risk is greatest," Dr. Jeremiah Clinton, an orthopedic surgeon and associate professor of orthopedics at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in an American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons news release. "By recognizing when that period of increased risk occurs, physicians have a window of opportunity to take steps that may possibly prevent a subsequent fracture."

The study was published in the March issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

The exact relationship between arm and hip fractures isn't clear, but "there is evidence to support that both fractures stem from similar reactions to a fall," Clinton said. "When patients age, their reflexes slow down, and they may not have the time or ability to correctly position themselves as they fall. Rather than trying to catch themselves as a younger person would do, studies show that elderly people have a tendency to simply tuck and roll, which causes greater force on the shoulder and hip."

Causes of falls among elderly people include: effects of medications, neurological disorders, loss of an ability to maintain balance and decreased reaction time.

"One of the first steps a patient should take following a fall is to talk with their orthopedist and other physicians to determine the cause," Clinton said. "Once the cause is more clearly understood, the proper steps can be taken to decrease a patient's risk of having another fall and potentially future fractures."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about falls and fractures.
SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 02, 2009

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