ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Smog Tougher on the Obese
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks

MONDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who suffer a broken upper arm are five times more likely than normal to break a hip within a year after the arm fracture, a finding from a new study that might help in efforts to prevent both types of fractures.

"There have been studies in the past showing a relationship between upper arm fractures and hip fractures, but we wanted to determine when that risk is greatest," Dr. Jeremiah Clinton, an orthopedic surgeon and associate professor of orthopedics at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in an American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons news release. "By recognizing when that period of increased risk occurs, physicians have a window of opportunity to take steps that may possibly prevent a subsequent fracture."

The study was published in the March issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

The exact relationship between arm and hip fractures isn't clear, but "there is evidence to support that both fractures stem from similar reactions to a fall," Clinton said. "When patients age, their reflexes slow down, and they may not have the time or ability to correctly position themselves as they fall. Rather than trying to catch themselves as a younger person would do, studies show that elderly people have a tendency to simply tuck and roll, which causes greater force on the shoulder and hip."

Causes of falls among elderly people include: effects of medications, neurological disorders, loss of an ability to maintain balance and decreased reaction time.

"One of the first steps a patient should take following a fall is to talk with their orthopedist and other physicians to determine the cause," Clinton said. "Once the cause is more clearly understood, the proper steps can be taken to decrease a patient's risk of having another fall and potentially future fractures."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about falls and fractures.
SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 02, 2009

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