ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage

Curcumin -- a component of the Indian spice turmeric -- may delay the inflammation-related liver damage that leads to cirrhosis, according to a new study in the journal Gut.

Another study in the same issue of the journal found that hair dye and smoking are linked to progressive liver disease.

In the first study, researchers analyzed tissue and blood samples from mice with chronic liver inflammation before and after curcumin was added to the rodents' diet for a period of four and eight weeks.

Consuming curcumin significantly reduced bile duct blockage and curbed liver cell damage and liver scarring (fibrosis). Curcumin interferes with several chemical signaling pathways involved in the inflammatory process, said Michael Trauner, of Medical University in Graz, Austria, and colleagues.

The benefits were seen at both four weeks and eight weeks. No such effects were noted in mice with chronic liver inflammation that were fed a normal diet. The findings suggest that curcumin may offer a promising treatment for liver inflammation, the researchers said.

They noted that the current treatment for inflammatory liver disease is ursodeoxycholic acid, but the long-term effects of this therapy aren't clear. The other alternative is liver transplant.

In the second study, British researchers sent questionnaires to thousands of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), an early form of liver cirrhosis. In people with PBC, the liver's bile ducts become inflamed, scarred and blocked, resulting in extensive tissue damage and liver cirrhosis. It's believed that environmental factors play a role in PBC.

The questionnaire asked participants about exposure to potential environmental and genetic risk factors associated with primary biliary cirrhosis. The responses showed that autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid and celiac diseases were all more common among patients with PBC. The researchers also found that people with a family history of autoimmune disease were more likely to have PBC. Psoriasis, urinary infection and shingles also significantly increased the likelihood of having the condition.

Compared to the general population, people with primary biliary cirrhosis were 63 percent more likely to have smoked at some point in their lives and to have started smoking before being diagnosed with PBC.

Women who used hair dye were 37 percent more likely to develop PBC than women who didn't use hair dye. Previous research has suggested a link between PBC and chemicals in cosmetics, particularly octynoic acid, which is found in hair dye and nail polish.

SOURCES: Gut, news release, March 24, 2010 Published on: March 25, 2010