ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Light - Live Longer
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
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Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike

Medical personnel tend to think that people in general -- themselves included -- are poorly informed about herbal medicines and that their patients' faith in the power of such remedies is misplaced, according to a new survey.

The survey was conducted online among 164 subscribers to the journal Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, which published the results online April 8. More than 80 percent of the respondents were doctors, mostly family physicians, and most of the other respondents were pharmacists.

More than 85 percent of the survey participants indicated that they believe the public is poorly informed about herbal medicines. None considered the public to be well informed. However, 75 percent said that doctors also are poorly informed on the subject, with 22 percent indicating that doctors are "moderately well informed."

Nearly half (48 percent) of the respondents said their own knowledge and understanding of herbal medicines was either "quite poor" or "very poor," and 90 percent said their knowledge of herbal medicines was much poorer than their knowledge of prescription drugs.

About 70 percent said that if they knew a patient was taking an herbal remedy about which they had little knowledge, they would get further information before starting or adjusting prescription drugs. Uncertainty about how to use such information was among the reasons they cited for not seeking further information about herbal medicines.

Among the other findings:

* More than 70 percent of the respondents said the public has misplaced faith in the effectiveness of herbal remedies.
* About 77 percent said they worried that their patients would take herbal medicines and not tell them. Nonetheless, just 13 percent said they always ask whether a patient is taking herbal medicines when reviewing or planning prescription drug treatment, and 55 percent said they never ask or do so only occasionally.
* Only 3 percent of respondents said they know a great deal about herbal medicine regulatory rules, and 85 percent said they believe that herbal medicines are not well regulated.

"It's obviously worrying that doctors in general seem to know so little about herbal medicines, given the widespread use of such products," Dr. Ike Iheanacho, editor of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, said in a news release from the journal. "The fact that few doctors make a point of asking patients whether they are taking herbal medicines raises further safety concerns. Similarly unsettling is that even when doctors don't know the effects of a herbal medicine a patient is taking, many won't try and look these up."

SOURCES: BMJ Journals, news release, April 7, 2010 Published on: April 08, 2010