ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Laugh and the World Understands
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike

Medical personnel tend to think that people in general -- themselves included -- are poorly informed about herbal medicines and that their patients' faith in the power of such remedies is misplaced, according to a new survey.

The survey was conducted online among 164 subscribers to the journal Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, which published the results online April 8. More than 80 percent of the respondents were doctors, mostly family physicians, and most of the other respondents were pharmacists.

More than 85 percent of the survey participants indicated that they believe the public is poorly informed about herbal medicines. None considered the public to be well informed. However, 75 percent said that doctors also are poorly informed on the subject, with 22 percent indicating that doctors are "moderately well informed."

Nearly half (48 percent) of the respondents said their own knowledge and understanding of herbal medicines was either "quite poor" or "very poor," and 90 percent said their knowledge of herbal medicines was much poorer than their knowledge of prescription drugs.

About 70 percent said that if they knew a patient was taking an herbal remedy about which they had little knowledge, they would get further information before starting or adjusting prescription drugs. Uncertainty about how to use such information was among the reasons they cited for not seeking further information about herbal medicines.

Among the other findings:

* More than 70 percent of the respondents said the public has misplaced faith in the effectiveness of herbal remedies.
* About 77 percent said they worried that their patients would take herbal medicines and not tell them. Nonetheless, just 13 percent said they always ask whether a patient is taking herbal medicines when reviewing or planning prescription drug treatment, and 55 percent said they never ask or do so only occasionally.
* Only 3 percent of respondents said they know a great deal about herbal medicine regulatory rules, and 85 percent said they believe that herbal medicines are not well regulated.

"It's obviously worrying that doctors in general seem to know so little about herbal medicines, given the widespread use of such products," Dr. Ike Iheanacho, editor of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, said in a news release from the journal. "The fact that few doctors make a point of asking patients whether they are taking herbal medicines raises further safety concerns. Similarly unsettling is that even when doctors don't know the effects of a herbal medicine a patient is taking, many won't try and look these up."

SOURCES: BMJ Journals, news release, April 7, 2010 Published on: April 08, 2010