ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Add your Article

Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A new study has found a strong association between insulin resistance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which leads to a four-to-five times increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

People with the highest levels of insulin resistance (often a precursor to diabetes) had nearly twice as much PAD, regardless of other cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. For each quartile of insulin resistance, the risk of PAD increased by about 25 percent.

According to the American Heart Association, PAD involves a narrowing of the arteries leading to the extremities, most notably the legs. It can cause cramping and tiredness in the limbs.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 3,200 adults enrolled in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. They compared PAD incidence and insulin sensitivity using a model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a test derived from fasting glucose and insulin values.

The overall prevalence of PAD was 5.5 percent. Insulin resistance was independently associated with PAD after the researchers adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, body mass index, chronic kidney disease and blood levels of c-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

"We found a roughly 25 percent increase in the risk of PAD for each one-quartile increase in HOMA-IR, a finding that remained consistent despite adjustment for typical atherosclerosis risk factors related to insulin resistance such as body mass index and glycemic [blood sugar] control," study lead author Dr. Reena L. Pande, of the cardiovascular division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a prepared statement.

"Even after excluding subjects with diabetes, there were graded increases in PAD prevalence with increasing HOMA-IR quartiles, supporting prior observations that PAD is associated with the metabolic syndrome and glucose intolerance, both surrogate markers of insulin resistance.

"Further, the association persisted after adjustment for diabetes or hemoglobin A1c, another measure of blood sugar control, indicating that insulin resistance may play a role in PAD along the entire spectrum of insulin resistance, quite distinct from the impact of diabetes," Pande said.

The study was published in the journal Circulation.

"For doctors and patients, our study highlights the role of insulin resistance in PAD and gives us a snapshot of the association between the two diseases," Pande said. "For this to play out, however, we still need prospective studies that follow over time insulin-resistant patients to determine their risk of developing PAD."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about peripheral arterial disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, June 16, 2008

Last Updated: June 16, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com