ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
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Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A new study has found a strong association between insulin resistance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which leads to a four-to-five times increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

People with the highest levels of insulin resistance (often a precursor to diabetes) had nearly twice as much PAD, regardless of other cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. For each quartile of insulin resistance, the risk of PAD increased by about 25 percent.

According to the American Heart Association, PAD involves a narrowing of the arteries leading to the extremities, most notably the legs. It can cause cramping and tiredness in the limbs.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 3,200 adults enrolled in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. They compared PAD incidence and insulin sensitivity using a model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a test derived from fasting glucose and insulin values.

The overall prevalence of PAD was 5.5 percent. Insulin resistance was independently associated with PAD after the researchers adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, body mass index, chronic kidney disease and blood levels of c-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

"We found a roughly 25 percent increase in the risk of PAD for each one-quartile increase in HOMA-IR, a finding that remained consistent despite adjustment for typical atherosclerosis risk factors related to insulin resistance such as body mass index and glycemic [blood sugar] control," study lead author Dr. Reena L. Pande, of the cardiovascular division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a prepared statement.

"Even after excluding subjects with diabetes, there were graded increases in PAD prevalence with increasing HOMA-IR quartiles, supporting prior observations that PAD is associated with the metabolic syndrome and glucose intolerance, both surrogate markers of insulin resistance.

"Further, the association persisted after adjustment for diabetes or hemoglobin A1c, another measure of blood sugar control, indicating that insulin resistance may play a role in PAD along the entire spectrum of insulin resistance, quite distinct from the impact of diabetes," Pande said.

The study was published in the journal Circulation.

"For doctors and patients, our study highlights the role of insulin resistance in PAD and gives us a snapshot of the association between the two diseases," Pande said. "For this to play out, however, we still need prospective studies that follow over time insulin-resistant patients to determine their risk of developing PAD."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about peripheral arterial disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, June 16, 2008

Last Updated: June 16, 2008

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