ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A new study has found a strong association between insulin resistance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which leads to a four-to-five times increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

People with the highest levels of insulin resistance (often a precursor to diabetes) had nearly twice as much PAD, regardless of other cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. For each quartile of insulin resistance, the risk of PAD increased by about 25 percent.

According to the American Heart Association, PAD involves a narrowing of the arteries leading to the extremities, most notably the legs. It can cause cramping and tiredness in the limbs.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 3,200 adults enrolled in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. They compared PAD incidence and insulin sensitivity using a model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a test derived from fasting glucose and insulin values.

The overall prevalence of PAD was 5.5 percent. Insulin resistance was independently associated with PAD after the researchers adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, body mass index, chronic kidney disease and blood levels of c-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

"We found a roughly 25 percent increase in the risk of PAD for each one-quartile increase in HOMA-IR, a finding that remained consistent despite adjustment for typical atherosclerosis risk factors related to insulin resistance such as body mass index and glycemic [blood sugar] control," study lead author Dr. Reena L. Pande, of the cardiovascular division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a prepared statement.

"Even after excluding subjects with diabetes, there were graded increases in PAD prevalence with increasing HOMA-IR quartiles, supporting prior observations that PAD is associated with the metabolic syndrome and glucose intolerance, both surrogate markers of insulin resistance.

"Further, the association persisted after adjustment for diabetes or hemoglobin A1c, another measure of blood sugar control, indicating that insulin resistance may play a role in PAD along the entire spectrum of insulin resistance, quite distinct from the impact of diabetes," Pande said.

The study was published in the journal Circulation.

"For doctors and patients, our study highlights the role of insulin resistance in PAD and gives us a snapshot of the association between the two diseases," Pande said. "For this to play out, however, we still need prospective studies that follow over time insulin-resistant patients to determine their risk of developing PAD."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about peripheral arterial disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, June 16, 2008

Last Updated: June 16, 2008

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