ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A new study has found a strong association between insulin resistance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which leads to a four-to-five times increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

People with the highest levels of insulin resistance (often a precursor to diabetes) had nearly twice as much PAD, regardless of other cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. For each quartile of insulin resistance, the risk of PAD increased by about 25 percent.

According to the American Heart Association, PAD involves a narrowing of the arteries leading to the extremities, most notably the legs. It can cause cramping and tiredness in the limbs.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 3,200 adults enrolled in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. They compared PAD incidence and insulin sensitivity using a model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a test derived from fasting glucose and insulin values.

The overall prevalence of PAD was 5.5 percent. Insulin resistance was independently associated with PAD after the researchers adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, body mass index, chronic kidney disease and blood levels of c-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.

"We found a roughly 25 percent increase in the risk of PAD for each one-quartile increase in HOMA-IR, a finding that remained consistent despite adjustment for typical atherosclerosis risk factors related to insulin resistance such as body mass index and glycemic [blood sugar] control," study lead author Dr. Reena L. Pande, of the cardiovascular division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a prepared statement.

"Even after excluding subjects with diabetes, there were graded increases in PAD prevalence with increasing HOMA-IR quartiles, supporting prior observations that PAD is associated with the metabolic syndrome and glucose intolerance, both surrogate markers of insulin resistance.

"Further, the association persisted after adjustment for diabetes or hemoglobin A1c, another measure of blood sugar control, indicating that insulin resistance may play a role in PAD along the entire spectrum of insulin resistance, quite distinct from the impact of diabetes," Pande said.

The study was published in the journal Circulation.

"For doctors and patients, our study highlights the role of insulin resistance in PAD and gives us a snapshot of the association between the two diseases," Pande said. "For this to play out, however, we still need prospective studies that follow over time insulin-resistant patients to determine their risk of developing PAD."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about peripheral arterial disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, June 16, 2008

Last Updated: June 16, 2008

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