ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

It Pays to Eat Less as You Age

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Eat less, weigh less.

While it may sound painfully obvious, nutrition experts have been divided over whether cutting calories leads to long-term weight loss, because the practice can sometimes boomerang, triggering binge eating and weight gain.

But, new research suggests that eating less can pay big dividends, particularly as you age.

Publishing in the current issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion, researchers from Brigham Young University reported that the middle-aged women they studied had more than twice the risk of significant weight gain if they didn't cut back on food consumption.

"Some suggest that restrained eating is not a good practice," BYU professor Larry Tucker, the study's lead author, said in a university news release. "Given the environmental forces in America's food industry, not practicing restraint is essentially a guarantee of failure."

The researchers followed 192 middle-aged women for three years and compiled information on their lifestyles, health and eating habits. The analysis revealed that women who didn't practice more restraint while eating were 138 percent more likely to put on 6.6 pounds or more, the news release said.

Columbia University researcher Lance Davidson, who was not involved with the study, said the findings underscore a key principle of weight control.

"Because the body's energy requirements progressively decline with age, energy intake must mirror that decrease or weight gain occurs," Davidson said. "Dr. Tucker's observation that women who practice eating restraint avoid the significant weight gain commonly observed in middle age is an important health message."

Tucker said the benefits of cutting back on what you eat aren't limited to your reflection in a mirror. Healthful eating equals better health, he said.

"Weight gain and obesity bring a greater risk of diabetes and a number of other chronic diseases," he said. "Eating properly is a skill that needs to be practiced."

Tucker offers these tips for better eating:

* Record what you eat and how much.
* Put less food on your plate.
* Eat more fruits and vegetables. The U.S. food pyramid recommends at least five servings each day.

More information

To learn more about growing older and eating better, visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.



-- HealthDay staff



SOURCE: Brigham Young University, news release, Jan. 2, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 06, 2009

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