ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Free Range
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

It Pays to Eat Less as You Age

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Eat less, weigh less.

While it may sound painfully obvious, nutrition experts have been divided over whether cutting calories leads to long-term weight loss, because the practice can sometimes boomerang, triggering binge eating and weight gain.

But, new research suggests that eating less can pay big dividends, particularly as you age.

Publishing in the current issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion, researchers from Brigham Young University reported that the middle-aged women they studied had more than twice the risk of significant weight gain if they didn't cut back on food consumption.

"Some suggest that restrained eating is not a good practice," BYU professor Larry Tucker, the study's lead author, said in a university news release. "Given the environmental forces in America's food industry, not practicing restraint is essentially a guarantee of failure."

The researchers followed 192 middle-aged women for three years and compiled information on their lifestyles, health and eating habits. The analysis revealed that women who didn't practice more restraint while eating were 138 percent more likely to put on 6.6 pounds or more, the news release said.

Columbia University researcher Lance Davidson, who was not involved with the study, said the findings underscore a key principle of weight control.

"Because the body's energy requirements progressively decline with age, energy intake must mirror that decrease or weight gain occurs," Davidson said. "Dr. Tucker's observation that women who practice eating restraint avoid the significant weight gain commonly observed in middle age is an important health message."

Tucker said the benefits of cutting back on what you eat aren't limited to your reflection in a mirror. Healthful eating equals better health, he said.

"Weight gain and obesity bring a greater risk of diabetes and a number of other chronic diseases," he said. "Eating properly is a skill that needs to be practiced."

Tucker offers these tips for better eating:

* Record what you eat and how much.
* Put less food on your plate.
* Eat more fruits and vegetables. The U.S. food pyramid recommends at least five servings each day.

More information

To learn more about growing older and eating better, visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.



-- HealthDay staff



SOURCE: Brigham Young University, news release, Jan. 2, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 06, 2009

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