ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Tune Up Your Health With Music
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Add your Article

It Pays to Eat Less as You Age

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Eat less, weigh less.

While it may sound painfully obvious, nutrition experts have been divided over whether cutting calories leads to long-term weight loss, because the practice can sometimes boomerang, triggering binge eating and weight gain.

But, new research suggests that eating less can pay big dividends, particularly as you age.

Publishing in the current issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion, researchers from Brigham Young University reported that the middle-aged women they studied had more than twice the risk of significant weight gain if they didn't cut back on food consumption.

"Some suggest that restrained eating is not a good practice," BYU professor Larry Tucker, the study's lead author, said in a university news release. "Given the environmental forces in America's food industry, not practicing restraint is essentially a guarantee of failure."

The researchers followed 192 middle-aged women for three years and compiled information on their lifestyles, health and eating habits. The analysis revealed that women who didn't practice more restraint while eating were 138 percent more likely to put on 6.6 pounds or more, the news release said.

Columbia University researcher Lance Davidson, who was not involved with the study, said the findings underscore a key principle of weight control.

"Because the body's energy requirements progressively decline with age, energy intake must mirror that decrease or weight gain occurs," Davidson said. "Dr. Tucker's observation that women who practice eating restraint avoid the significant weight gain commonly observed in middle age is an important health message."

Tucker said the benefits of cutting back on what you eat aren't limited to your reflection in a mirror. Healthful eating equals better health, he said.

"Weight gain and obesity bring a greater risk of diabetes and a number of other chronic diseases," he said. "Eating properly is a skill that needs to be practiced."

Tucker offers these tips for better eating:

* Record what you eat and how much.
* Put less food on your plate.
* Eat more fruits and vegetables. The U.S. food pyramid recommends at least five servings each day.

More information

To learn more about growing older and eating better, visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.



-- HealthDay staff



SOURCE: Brigham Young University, news release, Jan. 2, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 06, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com