ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
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Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays

HealthDay News) -- They're not Scrooges, but people with allergies and asthma can have bad reactions to certain holiday traditions and need to take special steps to prevent sneezing and wheezing, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

Those who are allergic to live evergreens may choose to decorate with artificial plants, but both live and artificial trees can trigger symptoms, experts say. They offer the following hints to help people avoid allergy and asthma symptoms over the holiday season:

* Some allergies are triggered by terpene, which is found in the oil or sap of live evergreen trees, wreaths and garlands. Other allergy sufferers may react to mold or pollen on trees and natural decorations. The ACAAI suggests washing pollen and mold off live trees, especially the trunk, with a garden hose and leaving the tree in a bucket of water in the garage or a covered porch while it dries. Wear gloves when handling the tree to protect against contact with sap.
* For those who are allergic to dust and mold, even artificial trees can be a problem if they haven't been stored properly. Because dust and mold can accumulate on these items, it is a good idea to wash the tree outside before setting it up inside the house for decorating. The best way to store an artificial tree is to place it in an air-tight bag or container.
* Ornaments and other decorations can also gather dust and mold and are best stored in air-tight containers. Thoroughly clean each item before putting it on display.
* Artificial snow spray shouldn't be used indoors because it can trigger asthma and allergy symptoms. Other potential triggers include scented candles, potpourri and other scents, and wood-burning fireplaces, the ACAAI warns.
* Food allergies are another potential problem during the holidays. Those with food allergies should ask party or dinner hosts about the ingredients used in each dish. It is also a good idea to prepare a dish you know is "safe" for you to eat and bring it along to share. When hosting a gathering, talk to guests in advance about food allergies.
* When traveling, remember to pack your asthma and allergy medications. If the trip requires air travel, keep those items in a carry-on bag. Bringing a pillow and mattress cover is recommended for those affected by dust mites.

Stress doesn't cause allergies or asthma but can weaken your immune system. Make sure you take time in your busy holiday schedule to stay on top of your allergy and asthma symptoms so that illness doesn't ruin your holiday plans. People with asthma should talk with their doctor about getting a flu shot, the ACAAI recommends.

SOURCES: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, news release, Nov. 25, 2009 Published on: December 05, 2009