ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
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Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays

HealthDay News) -- They're not Scrooges, but people with allergies and asthma can have bad reactions to certain holiday traditions and need to take special steps to prevent sneezing and wheezing, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

Those who are allergic to live evergreens may choose to decorate with artificial plants, but both live and artificial trees can trigger symptoms, experts say. They offer the following hints to help people avoid allergy and asthma symptoms over the holiday season:

* Some allergies are triggered by terpene, which is found in the oil or sap of live evergreen trees, wreaths and garlands. Other allergy sufferers may react to mold or pollen on trees and natural decorations. The ACAAI suggests washing pollen and mold off live trees, especially the trunk, with a garden hose and leaving the tree in a bucket of water in the garage or a covered porch while it dries. Wear gloves when handling the tree to protect against contact with sap.
* For those who are allergic to dust and mold, even artificial trees can be a problem if they haven't been stored properly. Because dust and mold can accumulate on these items, it is a good idea to wash the tree outside before setting it up inside the house for decorating. The best way to store an artificial tree is to place it in an air-tight bag or container.
* Ornaments and other decorations can also gather dust and mold and are best stored in air-tight containers. Thoroughly clean each item before putting it on display.
* Artificial snow spray shouldn't be used indoors because it can trigger asthma and allergy symptoms. Other potential triggers include scented candles, potpourri and other scents, and wood-burning fireplaces, the ACAAI warns.
* Food allergies are another potential problem during the holidays. Those with food allergies should ask party or dinner hosts about the ingredients used in each dish. It is also a good idea to prepare a dish you know is "safe" for you to eat and bring it along to share. When hosting a gathering, talk to guests in advance about food allergies.
* When traveling, remember to pack your asthma and allergy medications. If the trip requires air travel, keep those items in a carry-on bag. Bringing a pillow and mattress cover is recommended for those affected by dust mites.

Stress doesn't cause allergies or asthma but can weaken your immune system. Make sure you take time in your busy holiday schedule to stay on top of your allergy and asthma symptoms so that illness doesn't ruin your holiday plans. People with asthma should talk with their doctor about getting a flu shot, the ACAAI recommends.

SOURCES: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, news release, Nov. 25, 2009 Published on: December 05, 2009