ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
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Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active

(HealthDay News) -- Older adults might want to remember to exercise their brains regularly.

Brain-stimulating activity, according to a new study, can delay the rapid loss of memory that precedes dementia.

For five years, researchers followed 488 adults, aged 75 to 85, who did not have dementia at the start of the study. They recorded the number of brain-stimulating activities that people participated in each week.

About a fifth of the participants had developed dementia by the end of the study, but the onset of memory decline appeared to vary based on the amount of mental exercise they had gotten.

Every time a senior took part in an activity such as reading, writing or playing games or music, the person appeared to delay rapid memory loss by about two to three months, the study found. A report on the study appears in the Aug. 4 issue of Neurology.

"The point of accelerated decline was delayed by 1.29 years for the person who participated in 11 activities per week compared to the person who participated in only four activities per week," study author Charles B. Hall, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

Activities included reading, writing, doing crossword puzzles, playing board or card games, having group discussions and playing music. On average, those who developed dementia did one activity a day.

"The effect of these activities in late life appears to be independent of education," Hall said. "These activities might help maintain brain vitality."

Hall noted, however, that further study would be needed to determine whether increasing participation in such activities might prevent or delay dementia.

SOURCES: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Aug. 3, 2009