ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Hoping for a Happy Family Holiday? Here's How
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active

(HealthDay News) -- Older adults might want to remember to exercise their brains regularly.

Brain-stimulating activity, according to a new study, can delay the rapid loss of memory that precedes dementia.

For five years, researchers followed 488 adults, aged 75 to 85, who did not have dementia at the start of the study. They recorded the number of brain-stimulating activities that people participated in each week.

About a fifth of the participants had developed dementia by the end of the study, but the onset of memory decline appeared to vary based on the amount of mental exercise they had gotten.

Every time a senior took part in an activity such as reading, writing or playing games or music, the person appeared to delay rapid memory loss by about two to three months, the study found. A report on the study appears in the Aug. 4 issue of Neurology.

"The point of accelerated decline was delayed by 1.29 years for the person who participated in 11 activities per week compared to the person who participated in only four activities per week," study author Charles B. Hall, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

Activities included reading, writing, doing crossword puzzles, playing board or card games, having group discussions and playing music. On average, those who developed dementia did one activity a day.

"The effect of these activities in late life appears to be independent of education," Hall said. "These activities might help maintain brain vitality."

Hall noted, however, that further study would be needed to determine whether increasing participation in such activities might prevent or delay dementia.

SOURCES: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Aug. 3, 2009