ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Countdown to Hair Loss
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
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Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe

MONDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although rare, golf-related eye injures in children can be devastating, says a U.S. study.

The researchers looked at six boys and five girls, average age 10.2 years, treated at two institutions over 15 years.

"Ten patients (91 percent) were injured by golf clubs and one patient (9 percent) by a golf ball," wrote Dr. Eric M. Hink, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, and colleagues.

The injuries suffered by the children included orbital fracture (a break in the bones forming the eye socket) in 11 eyes, blood in the eye in four eyes, and damage to the optic nerve in three eyes.

"At the initial examination, visual acuity was 20/20 in four eyes (36 percent), 20/25 to 20/80 in three eyes (27 percent), no light perception in three eyes (27 percent) and undeterminable in one eye (9 percent) because of altered mental status," the study authors wrote.

Nine (82 percent) of the children required surgery. At the final follow-up visit (average of one year), two eyes (18 percent) had no light perception, visual acuity was 20/70 in one eye (9 percent) and 20/20 or better in eight eyes (73 percent).

The study was published in the September issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Only one of the injuries actually occurred on a golf course during supervised play, said the researchers, who noted that most "children are injured by other children wielding a golf club while at play away from the golf course."

"Increased public awareness may help to decrease morbidity from golf-related ophthalmic injuries to children," the study authors concluded. "We recommend close adult supervision, adequate separation between children and protective eyewear for children learning to play golf. Furthermore, and most critically, golf equipment should be stored in a secure area away from children. Children should be taught that golf equipment should never be used without supervision. The efforts of ophthalmologists to prevent eye injures in other sports, notably hockey and baseball, have been successful and should serve as models to prevent golf-related ocular injuries in the pediatric population."

More information

Prevent Blindness America has more about children and eye safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 08, 2008

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