ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe

MONDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although rare, golf-related eye injures in children can be devastating, says a U.S. study.

The researchers looked at six boys and five girls, average age 10.2 years, treated at two institutions over 15 years.

"Ten patients (91 percent) were injured by golf clubs and one patient (9 percent) by a golf ball," wrote Dr. Eric M. Hink, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, and colleagues.

The injuries suffered by the children included orbital fracture (a break in the bones forming the eye socket) in 11 eyes, blood in the eye in four eyes, and damage to the optic nerve in three eyes.

"At the initial examination, visual acuity was 20/20 in four eyes (36 percent), 20/25 to 20/80 in three eyes (27 percent), no light perception in three eyes (27 percent) and undeterminable in one eye (9 percent) because of altered mental status," the study authors wrote.

Nine (82 percent) of the children required surgery. At the final follow-up visit (average of one year), two eyes (18 percent) had no light perception, visual acuity was 20/70 in one eye (9 percent) and 20/20 or better in eight eyes (73 percent).

The study was published in the September issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Only one of the injuries actually occurred on a golf course during supervised play, said the researchers, who noted that most "children are injured by other children wielding a golf club while at play away from the golf course."

"Increased public awareness may help to decrease morbidity from golf-related ophthalmic injuries to children," the study authors concluded. "We recommend close adult supervision, adequate separation between children and protective eyewear for children learning to play golf. Furthermore, and most critically, golf equipment should be stored in a secure area away from children. Children should be taught that golf equipment should never be used without supervision. The efforts of ophthalmologists to prevent eye injures in other sports, notably hockey and baseball, have been successful and should serve as models to prevent golf-related ocular injuries in the pediatric population."

More information

Prevent Blindness America has more about children and eye safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 08, 2008

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