ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Add your Article

Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe

MONDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although rare, golf-related eye injures in children can be devastating, says a U.S. study.

The researchers looked at six boys and five girls, average age 10.2 years, treated at two institutions over 15 years.

"Ten patients (91 percent) were injured by golf clubs and one patient (9 percent) by a golf ball," wrote Dr. Eric M. Hink, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, and colleagues.

The injuries suffered by the children included orbital fracture (a break in the bones forming the eye socket) in 11 eyes, blood in the eye in four eyes, and damage to the optic nerve in three eyes.

"At the initial examination, visual acuity was 20/20 in four eyes (36 percent), 20/25 to 20/80 in three eyes (27 percent), no light perception in three eyes (27 percent) and undeterminable in one eye (9 percent) because of altered mental status," the study authors wrote.

Nine (82 percent) of the children required surgery. At the final follow-up visit (average of one year), two eyes (18 percent) had no light perception, visual acuity was 20/70 in one eye (9 percent) and 20/20 or better in eight eyes (73 percent).

The study was published in the September issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Only one of the injuries actually occurred on a golf course during supervised play, said the researchers, who noted that most "children are injured by other children wielding a golf club while at play away from the golf course."

"Increased public awareness may help to decrease morbidity from golf-related ophthalmic injuries to children," the study authors concluded. "We recommend close adult supervision, adequate separation between children and protective eyewear for children learning to play golf. Furthermore, and most critically, golf equipment should be stored in a secure area away from children. Children should be taught that golf equipment should never be used without supervision. The efforts of ophthalmologists to prevent eye injures in other sports, notably hockey and baseball, have been successful and should serve as models to prevent golf-related ocular injuries in the pediatric population."

More information

Prevent Blindness America has more about children and eye safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 08, 2008

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