ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest

FRIDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Children think other youngsters who wear glasses look smarter and are more honest than those who don't wear glasses, according to a U.S. study of 80 children.

In addition, the researchers found that children tend not to judge peers who wear glasses in terms of appearance, potential as a playmate, or likely athletic abilities.

These findings may help comfort children as they're fitted for their first pair of glasses, lead author Jeffrey Walline, an assistant professor of optometry at Ohio State University, suggested in a prepared statement.

"If the impression of looking smarter will appeal to a child, I would use that information and tell the child it is based on research. Most kids getting glasses for the first time are sensitive about how they're going to look. Some kids simply refuse to wear glasses, because they think they'll look ugly," Walline said.

The study included 42 girls and 38 boys, aged 6 to 10. Of those, 30 wore glasses, 34 had at least one sibling with glasses, and almost two-thirds had at least one parent who wore glasses. The study participants were shown 24 pairs of pictures of children. The children in each pair of pictures differed by gender and ethnicity, and each pair of pictures included one child with glasses and one child without glasses.

The children were asked a series of questions about each pair of photos. About two-thirds said children wearing glasses looked smarter than those without glasses, and 57 percent said children wearing glasses looked more honest.

The results suggest the media portrayals that associate glasses with intelligence may be reinforcing a stereotype that even young children accept, Walline said.

The children's answers to other questions about who they'd rather play with, who looked better at sports, who looked more shy, and who was better looking weren't consistent enough for the researchers to derive any solid conclusions.

What was clear was that the children didn't automatically consider kids with glasses to be unattractive.

"The concern about attractiveness with glasses seems to be more internal to a particular child rather than an indicator of how they'll feel about other people who wear glasses," Walline said.

The study was published in the May issue of Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics.

More information

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has more about eyeglasses for children and infants.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Ohio State University, news release, May 2008

Last Updated: May 23, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com