ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Countdown to Hair Loss
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Add your Article

Laugh and the World Understands

Though basic emotions such as amusement, anger, fear and sadness are not always expressed the same way in every culture, some are universally recognizable, a new study contends.

Specifically, the researchers investigated whether the sounds associated with basic emotions are the same in different cultures. To do this, people in England and in remote settlements in northern Namibia were told a story based on a particular emotion, which was followed by two different types of emotion-related sounds, such as laughter or crying. The British group heard sounds from Namibia, and vice versa. The participants were asked to identify which of the two sounds reflected the emotion of the story.

"People from both groups seemed to find the basic emotions -- anger, fear, disgust, amusement, sadness and surprise -- the most easily recognizable," research leader Sophie Scott, of University College London, said in a news release from the Wellcome Trust, which co-funded the study. "This suggests that these emotions -- and their vocalizations -- are similar across all human cultures."

Laughter was particularly well-recognized by listeners in both groups, who agreed that laughter represented amusement, exemplified by the feeling of being tickled, according to the study, published online Jan. 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Tickling makes everyone laugh -- and not just [in] humans," study co-author Disa Sauter, of University College London, said in the news release. "We see this happen in other primates, such as chimpanzees, as well as other mammals. This suggests that laughter has deep evolutionary roots, possibly originating as part of playful communication between young infants and mothers."

The finding "supports the idea that laughter is universally associated with being tickled and reflects the feeling of enjoyment of physical play," Sauter added.

SOURCES: Wellcome Trust, news release, Jan. 25, 2010 Published on: January 31, 2010