ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Light - Live Longer
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
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Laugh and the World Understands

Though basic emotions such as amusement, anger, fear and sadness are not always expressed the same way in every culture, some are universally recognizable, a new study contends.

Specifically, the researchers investigated whether the sounds associated with basic emotions are the same in different cultures. To do this, people in England and in remote settlements in northern Namibia were told a story based on a particular emotion, which was followed by two different types of emotion-related sounds, such as laughter or crying. The British group heard sounds from Namibia, and vice versa. The participants were asked to identify which of the two sounds reflected the emotion of the story.

"People from both groups seemed to find the basic emotions -- anger, fear, disgust, amusement, sadness and surprise -- the most easily recognizable," research leader Sophie Scott, of University College London, said in a news release from the Wellcome Trust, which co-funded the study. "This suggests that these emotions -- and their vocalizations -- are similar across all human cultures."

Laughter was particularly well-recognized by listeners in both groups, who agreed that laughter represented amusement, exemplified by the feeling of being tickled, according to the study, published online Jan. 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Tickling makes everyone laugh -- and not just [in] humans," study co-author Disa Sauter, of University College London, said in the news release. "We see this happen in other primates, such as chimpanzees, as well as other mammals. This suggests that laughter has deep evolutionary roots, possibly originating as part of playful communication between young infants and mothers."

The finding "supports the idea that laughter is universally associated with being tickled and reflects the feeling of enjoyment of physical play," Sauter added.

SOURCES: Wellcome Trust, news release, Jan. 25, 2010 Published on: January 31, 2010