ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Laugh and the World Understands

Though basic emotions such as amusement, anger, fear and sadness are not always expressed the same way in every culture, some are universally recognizable, a new study contends.

Specifically, the researchers investigated whether the sounds associated with basic emotions are the same in different cultures. To do this, people in England and in remote settlements in northern Namibia were told a story based on a particular emotion, which was followed by two different types of emotion-related sounds, such as laughter or crying. The British group heard sounds from Namibia, and vice versa. The participants were asked to identify which of the two sounds reflected the emotion of the story.

"People from both groups seemed to find the basic emotions -- anger, fear, disgust, amusement, sadness and surprise -- the most easily recognizable," research leader Sophie Scott, of University College London, said in a news release from the Wellcome Trust, which co-funded the study. "This suggests that these emotions -- and their vocalizations -- are similar across all human cultures."

Laughter was particularly well-recognized by listeners in both groups, who agreed that laughter represented amusement, exemplified by the feeling of being tickled, according to the study, published online Jan. 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Tickling makes everyone laugh -- and not just [in] humans," study co-author Disa Sauter, of University College London, said in the news release. "We see this happen in other primates, such as chimpanzees, as well as other mammals. This suggests that laughter has deep evolutionary roots, possibly originating as part of playful communication between young infants and mothers."

The finding "supports the idea that laughter is universally associated with being tickled and reflects the feeling of enjoyment of physical play," Sauter added.

SOURCES: Wellcome Trust, news release, Jan. 25, 2010 Published on: January 31, 2010