ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Eat Light - Live Longer
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
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Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List

(HealthDay News) -- Leafy greens head a list of the top 10 riskiest foods regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a report released Tuesday by a public advocacy group says.

The 10 types of foods included in the list account for nearly 40 percent of all foodborne illness outbreaks linked to FDA-regulated foods since 1990, according to the report from the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

Unfortunately, the list includes some of the healthiest and most popular foods consumed by Americans, the report authors noted.

More than 1,500 separate, definable outbreaks that caused almost 50,000 illnesses were linked to these 10 foods, the report found. The illnesses ranged from gastrointestinal distress to long-term disability and death.

The report, based on U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, says the top 10 riskiest foods regulated by the FDA are:

* Leafy greens: 363 outbreaks involving 13,568 reported cases of illness.
* Eggs: 352 outbreaks with 11,163 reported cases of illness.
* Tuna: 268 outbreaks with 2,341 reported cases of illness.
* Oysters: 132 outbreaks with 3,409 reported cases of illness.
* Potatoes: 108 outbreaks with 3,659 reported cases of illness.
* Cheese: 83 outbreaks with 2,761 reported cases of illness.
* Ice Cream: 74 outbreaks with 2,594 reported cases of illness.
* Tomatoes: 31 outbreaks with 3,292 reported cases of illness.
* Sprouts: 31 outbreaks with 2,022 reported cases of illness.
* Berries: 25 outbreaks with 3,397 reported cases of illness.

Pathogens typically associated with meat and poultry -- such as salmonella and E. coli 0157:H7 -- have been repeatedly linked with outbreaks caused by these 10 types of foods. In fact, salmonella was the culprit in 33 percent of outbreaks involving the foods in the report. Along with salmonella and E. coli, other pathogens causing outbreaks associated with these foods include Campylobacter, Scombrotoxin, Norovirus and Vibrio.

The report noted that foodborne illness outbreaks are becoming more common in the United States because of a complex, globalized food system, outdated food safety laws, and the rise of large-scale production and processing.

In July, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a bill, backed by President Barack Obama, that would give the FDA expanded oversight of food producers. The bill would speed up the ability of health officials to track down the source of an outbreak and permit the government to mandate a recall, instead of having to rely on food producers to voluntarily pull tainted products from store shelves, according to the Washington Post.

The Senate is expected to take up its version of the bill this fall.

More information

SOURCES: The Center for Science in the Public Interest, news release, Oct. 6, 2009