ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Add your Article

Less Education May Mean Poorer Health

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- American adults with the least education have the worst health, a new study finds.

Almost half of U.S. adults ages 25 to 74 reported being in less than very good health, and levels of health differ depending on level of education, according to a report released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commission to Build a Healthier America.

For example, adults who didn't graduate from high school were more than 2.5 times as likely to be in less than very good health as college graduates. Those who graduated high school but didn't go to college were nearly twice as likely to be in less than very good health as college graduates.

The new report added to the commission's growing body of evidence that factors outside of the medical system play an important role in determining how healthy people are and even how long they will live.

"Access to affordable, high-quality medical care is essential, but that alone will not improve the health of Americans," commission co-chair Alice M. Rivlin said in a Johnson Foundation news release.

"What this report tells us is that education has a tremendous impact on how long and how well we live. Policymakers need to focus on schools and education, as well as promoting healthier homes, communities and workplaces, to improve the health of our nation," Rivlin said.

The report's authors said it is the first to look at health and education on a state-by-state basis. Among its other findings:

* 45 percent of U.S. adults reported being in less than very good health. Rates vary widely between states, from a low of 35 percent in Vermont to a high of 53 percent in Mississippi.
* Education-related differences in health can be seen within states. In Mississippi, nearly 75 percent of adults who hadn't graduated from high school reported being in less than very good health, compared with 37 percent of college graduates. In Vermont, which had the best overall health in adults, 68 percent of adults who hadn't finished high school said they were in less than very good health, compared with 22 percent of college graduates.
* Overall, racial and ethnic minorities were more likely than whites to report being in less than very good health. Education-related differences in health were seen within every racial or ethnic group. For example, 44 percent of black college graduates in the United States said they were in less than very good health, compared with 55 percent of those with some college education, 62 percent of high school graduates, and 73 percent of those who didn't finish high school.
* California had the largest gap between the overall rate of less than very good health and the rate for college graduates. The study found that 48 percent of all adults in California said they were in less than very good health, compared with 28 percent of college graduates in the state. Delaware had the smallest difference, with 41 percent of all adults reporting being in less than very good health, compared with 32 percent of college graduates.

"Regardless of where your state falls in these rankings, the news isn't good," commission co-chair Mark McClellan said in the news release. "Education is an important marker for an array of opportunities that can lead to better health. One of the most important things we can do for our nation's health is to improve education quality and educational attainment."

The report authors also established a benchmark rate for adult health by looking at the best level of health achieved in any state among college graduates who also have healthy behaviors. The benchmark was found in Vermont, where less than very good health was reported by only 19 percent of college graduates who exercised and didn't smoke.

A comparison of rates in every state against this benchmark shows that American adults at every education level and in every racial or ethnic group aren't as healthy as they could be, the report authors said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about health disparities.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, news release, May 6, 2009

Last Updated: May 06, 2009

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