ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
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When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back

SATURDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Following the example of professional movers can help you reduce the risk of injury the next time you move, says a new study that included 20 men who carried a load on a treadmill so that researchers could assess the effects on the shoulders, neck, back, abdomen and forearms.

The study found that carrying loads on your back rather than against the abdomen may reduce effort and lower the risk of injury. It also found that using assistive load carriage devices can improve grip and lessen the strain on the back and forearms.

"We found that professional movers often carry loads against their backs, mainly because they found it to be more practical and less painful. However, more research is needed with professional movers or warehouse workers to see if the back carry technique reduces the risk of back injury without increasing the risks of other injuries," study co-author Joan M. Stevenson, said in an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) news release. The study was presented this week at the ACSM annual meeting in Seattle.

She and her colleagues found that movers who use the back carry technique feel they lift more safely, reduce their risk of tripping, and are less likely to suffer back pain.

"This technique may be very important when it comes to injury prevention, whether it is on a professional mover or just a college student moving to an apartment. We know that some people do not have the shoulder flexibility or grip strength to perform this technique, so an assistive lifting device can be valuable," Stevenson said.

Before moving, you should gently warm up your body with low-intensity muscle stretching for about 10 to 15 minutes, the ACSM said. It also recommends regular stretching sessions two to three times a week to improve flexibility and other aspects of health.

SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine, news release, May 27, 2009 Published on: May 30, 2009