ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
What you need to know about swine flu.
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back

SATURDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Following the example of professional movers can help you reduce the risk of injury the next time you move, says a new study that included 20 men who carried a load on a treadmill so that researchers could assess the effects on the shoulders, neck, back, abdomen and forearms.

The study found that carrying loads on your back rather than against the abdomen may reduce effort and lower the risk of injury. It also found that using assistive load carriage devices can improve grip and lessen the strain on the back and forearms.

"We found that professional movers often carry loads against their backs, mainly because they found it to be more practical and less painful. However, more research is needed with professional movers or warehouse workers to see if the back carry technique reduces the risk of back injury without increasing the risks of other injuries," study co-author Joan M. Stevenson, said in an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) news release. The study was presented this week at the ACSM annual meeting in Seattle.

She and her colleagues found that movers who use the back carry technique feel they lift more safely, reduce their risk of tripping, and are less likely to suffer back pain.

"This technique may be very important when it comes to injury prevention, whether it is on a professional mover or just a college student moving to an apartment. We know that some people do not have the shoulder flexibility or grip strength to perform this technique, so an assistive lifting device can be valuable," Stevenson said.

Before moving, you should gently warm up your body with low-intensity muscle stretching for about 10 to 15 minutes, the ACSM said. It also recommends regular stretching sessions two to three times a week to improve flexibility and other aspects of health.

SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine, news release, May 27, 2009 Published on: May 30, 2009