ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
CAREGIVING
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
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Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged adults who live alone are twice as likely to develop dementia or Alzheimer's disease later in life compared to those who are married or live with a partner. And the risk is three times higher among those who are divorced or widowed, according to a new study by Swedish and Finnish researchers.

The study included 2,000 men and women in Finland who were initially surveyed when they were about 50 years old and again 21 years later.

In addition to looking at the association between marital status and dementia, the researchers also examined the link between living alone and being a carrier of the apolipoprotein E e4 gene variant, a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

The study found the highest risk of developing Alzheimer's disease among people with the gene variant who live alone after losing their partner.

The findings add to a growing body of evidence that shows that social factors play an important role in brain health, and indicate that "supportive intervention for individuals who have lost a partner might be a promising strategy in preventive health care," according to Dr. Miia Kivipelto, of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and colleagues.

The study, which appears online July 2 in the BMJ, is one of the first to examine mid-life marital status and dementia risk.

In an accompanying editorial, epidemiologist Dr. Catherine Helmer of Victor Segalen University in Bordeaux, France, noted that the study strengthens the theory that cognitive impairment and dementia are affected by various factors throughout life and develop over a long period of time.

The findings could lead to preventive strategies that encourage unmarried people to boost their social involvement by taking part in community, cultural and sporting activities, Helmer said.

SOURCES: BMJ, news release, July 2, 2009