ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
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Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged adults who live alone are twice as likely to develop dementia or Alzheimer's disease later in life compared to those who are married or live with a partner. And the risk is three times higher among those who are divorced or widowed, according to a new study by Swedish and Finnish researchers.

The study included 2,000 men and women in Finland who were initially surveyed when they were about 50 years old and again 21 years later.

In addition to looking at the association between marital status and dementia, the researchers also examined the link between living alone and being a carrier of the apolipoprotein E e4 gene variant, a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

The study found the highest risk of developing Alzheimer's disease among people with the gene variant who live alone after losing their partner.

The findings add to a growing body of evidence that shows that social factors play an important role in brain health, and indicate that "supportive intervention for individuals who have lost a partner might be a promising strategy in preventive health care," according to Dr. Miia Kivipelto, of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and colleagues.

The study, which appears online July 2 in the BMJ, is one of the first to examine mid-life marital status and dementia risk.

In an accompanying editorial, epidemiologist Dr. Catherine Helmer of Victor Segalen University in Bordeaux, France, noted that the study strengthens the theory that cognitive impairment and dementia are affected by various factors throughout life and develop over a long period of time.

The findings could lead to preventive strategies that encourage unmarried people to boost their social involvement by taking part in community, cultural and sporting activities, Helmer said.

SOURCES: BMJ, news release, July 2, 2009