ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Holistic Dentistry-My View
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
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Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged adults who live alone are twice as likely to develop dementia or Alzheimer's disease later in life compared to those who are married or live with a partner. And the risk is three times higher among those who are divorced or widowed, according to a new study by Swedish and Finnish researchers.

The study included 2,000 men and women in Finland who were initially surveyed when they were about 50 years old and again 21 years later.

In addition to looking at the association between marital status and dementia, the researchers also examined the link between living alone and being a carrier of the apolipoprotein E e4 gene variant, a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

The study found the highest risk of developing Alzheimer's disease among people with the gene variant who live alone after losing their partner.

The findings add to a growing body of evidence that shows that social factors play an important role in brain health, and indicate that "supportive intervention for individuals who have lost a partner might be a promising strategy in preventive health care," according to Dr. Miia Kivipelto, of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and colleagues.

The study, which appears online July 2 in the BMJ, is one of the first to examine mid-life marital status and dementia risk.

In an accompanying editorial, epidemiologist Dr. Catherine Helmer of Victor Segalen University in Bordeaux, France, noted that the study strengthens the theory that cognitive impairment and dementia are affected by various factors throughout life and develop over a long period of time.

The findings could lead to preventive strategies that encourage unmarried people to boost their social involvement by taking part in community, cultural and sporting activities, Helmer said.

SOURCES: BMJ, news release, July 2, 2009