ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
Sleep and Do Better
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
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Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia

THURSDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged adults who live alone are twice as likely to develop dementia or Alzheimer's disease later in life compared to those who are married or live with a partner. And the risk is three times higher among those who are divorced or widowed, according to a new study by Swedish and Finnish researchers.

The study included 2,000 men and women in Finland who were initially surveyed when they were about 50 years old and again 21 years later.

In addition to looking at the association between marital status and dementia, the researchers also examined the link between living alone and being a carrier of the apolipoprotein E e4 gene variant, a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

The study found the highest risk of developing Alzheimer's disease among people with the gene variant who live alone after losing their partner.

The findings add to a growing body of evidence that shows that social factors play an important role in brain health, and indicate that "supportive intervention for individuals who have lost a partner might be a promising strategy in preventive health care," according to Dr. Miia Kivipelto, of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and colleagues.

The study, which appears online July 2 in the BMJ, is one of the first to examine mid-life marital status and dementia risk.

In an accompanying editorial, epidemiologist Dr. Catherine Helmer of Victor Segalen University in Bordeaux, France, noted that the study strengthens the theory that cognitive impairment and dementia are affected by various factors throughout life and develop over a long period of time.

The findings could lead to preventive strategies that encourage unmarried people to boost their social involvement by taking part in community, cultural and sporting activities, Helmer said.

SOURCES: BMJ, news release, July 2, 2009