ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Smog Tougher on the Obese
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss

(HealthDay News) -- If you want to lose weight, exercise and diet are crucial. But a new study says other factors appear to play a role, too -- including the number of TVs in your house and the presence of exercise equipment.

"The home environment really came out as a stronger factor than we would have anticipated," Suzanne Phelan, assistant professor of kinesiology at California Polytechnic State University and lead author of the new study, said in a news release.

Phelan and colleagues looked at the results of surveys of 167 people who lost a big chunk of their body weight -- at least 10 percent -- and managed to keep the pounds at bay for five or more years. The researchers compared this group to two other groups of people who were overweight or obese.

The researchers investigated what set the weight-losers apart from the others, and published their findings in the October issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Those who lost weight and kept it off were about three to four times more likely to exercise than those who were obese or overweight. They were also about 1.4 to 1.6 times more likely to spend time thinking about restraining their food intake, considering things like calories.

Those who lost weight had fewer televisions in their home and less high-fat food on hand. They also had more exercise equipment in their homes, the study authors noted.

"You have to pay attention to your home environment if you want to succeed," Phelan said. "Do you have TVs in every room? When you walk into your kitchen, do you see high-fat food or healthy food?"

Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University School of Medicine's Prevention Research Center, noted in the news release that the study's findings were "common sense" and "close to self-evident."

"If you want to choose better foods, keep better foods within reach. Don't just rely on willpower. If you want to be more active, create opportunities for exercise that are always within reach. Don't just rely on motivation," he said.

SOURCES: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, news release, Oct. 23, 2009 Published on: November 03, 2009