ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Sleep and Do Better
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
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Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss

(HealthDay News) -- If you want to lose weight, exercise and diet are crucial. But a new study says other factors appear to play a role, too -- including the number of TVs in your house and the presence of exercise equipment.

"The home environment really came out as a stronger factor than we would have anticipated," Suzanne Phelan, assistant professor of kinesiology at California Polytechnic State University and lead author of the new study, said in a news release.

Phelan and colleagues looked at the results of surveys of 167 people who lost a big chunk of their body weight -- at least 10 percent -- and managed to keep the pounds at bay for five or more years. The researchers compared this group to two other groups of people who were overweight or obese.

The researchers investigated what set the weight-losers apart from the others, and published their findings in the October issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Those who lost weight and kept it off were about three to four times more likely to exercise than those who were obese or overweight. They were also about 1.4 to 1.6 times more likely to spend time thinking about restraining their food intake, considering things like calories.

Those who lost weight had fewer televisions in their home and less high-fat food on hand. They also had more exercise equipment in their homes, the study authors noted.

"You have to pay attention to your home environment if you want to succeed," Phelan said. "Do you have TVs in every room? When you walk into your kitchen, do you see high-fat food or healthy food?"

Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University School of Medicine's Prevention Research Center, noted in the news release that the study's findings were "common sense" and "close to self-evident."

"If you want to choose better foods, keep better foods within reach. Don't just rely on willpower. If you want to be more active, create opportunities for exercise that are always within reach. Don't just rely on motivation," he said.

SOURCES: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, news release, Oct. 23, 2009 Published on: November 03, 2009