ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Add your Article

Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss

(HealthDay News) -- If you want to lose weight, exercise and diet are crucial. But a new study says other factors appear to play a role, too -- including the number of TVs in your house and the presence of exercise equipment.

"The home environment really came out as a stronger factor than we would have anticipated," Suzanne Phelan, assistant professor of kinesiology at California Polytechnic State University and lead author of the new study, said in a news release.

Phelan and colleagues looked at the results of surveys of 167 people who lost a big chunk of their body weight -- at least 10 percent -- and managed to keep the pounds at bay for five or more years. The researchers compared this group to two other groups of people who were overweight or obese.

The researchers investigated what set the weight-losers apart from the others, and published their findings in the October issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Those who lost weight and kept it off were about three to four times more likely to exercise than those who were obese or overweight. They were also about 1.4 to 1.6 times more likely to spend time thinking about restraining their food intake, considering things like calories.

Those who lost weight had fewer televisions in their home and less high-fat food on hand. They also had more exercise equipment in their homes, the study authors noted.

"You have to pay attention to your home environment if you want to succeed," Phelan said. "Do you have TVs in every room? When you walk into your kitchen, do you see high-fat food or healthy food?"

Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University School of Medicine's Prevention Research Center, noted in the news release that the study's findings were "common sense" and "close to self-evident."

"If you want to choose better foods, keep better foods within reach. Don't just rely on willpower. If you want to be more active, create opportunities for exercise that are always within reach. Don't just rely on motivation," he said.

SOURCES: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, news release, Oct. 23, 2009 Published on: November 03, 2009