ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
CANCER
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
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Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss

(HealthDay News) -- If you want to lose weight, exercise and diet are crucial. But a new study says other factors appear to play a role, too -- including the number of TVs in your house and the presence of exercise equipment.

"The home environment really came out as a stronger factor than we would have anticipated," Suzanne Phelan, assistant professor of kinesiology at California Polytechnic State University and lead author of the new study, said in a news release.

Phelan and colleagues looked at the results of surveys of 167 people who lost a big chunk of their body weight -- at least 10 percent -- and managed to keep the pounds at bay for five or more years. The researchers compared this group to two other groups of people who were overweight or obese.

The researchers investigated what set the weight-losers apart from the others, and published their findings in the October issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Those who lost weight and kept it off were about three to four times more likely to exercise than those who were obese or overweight. They were also about 1.4 to 1.6 times more likely to spend time thinking about restraining their food intake, considering things like calories.

Those who lost weight had fewer televisions in their home and less high-fat food on hand. They also had more exercise equipment in their homes, the study authors noted.

"You have to pay attention to your home environment if you want to succeed," Phelan said. "Do you have TVs in every room? When you walk into your kitchen, do you see high-fat food or healthy food?"

Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University School of Medicine's Prevention Research Center, noted in the news release that the study's findings were "common sense" and "close to self-evident."

"If you want to choose better foods, keep better foods within reach. Don't just rely on willpower. If you want to be more active, create opportunities for exercise that are always within reach. Don't just rely on motivation," he said.

SOURCES: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, news release, Oct. 23, 2009 Published on: November 03, 2009