ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
CANCER
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Eating your way to Good Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Add your Article

Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss

(HealthDay News) -- If you want to lose weight, exercise and diet are crucial. But a new study says other factors appear to play a role, too -- including the number of TVs in your house and the presence of exercise equipment.

"The home environment really came out as a stronger factor than we would have anticipated," Suzanne Phelan, assistant professor of kinesiology at California Polytechnic State University and lead author of the new study, said in a news release.

Phelan and colleagues looked at the results of surveys of 167 people who lost a big chunk of their body weight -- at least 10 percent -- and managed to keep the pounds at bay for five or more years. The researchers compared this group to two other groups of people who were overweight or obese.

The researchers investigated what set the weight-losers apart from the others, and published their findings in the October issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Those who lost weight and kept it off were about three to four times more likely to exercise than those who were obese or overweight. They were also about 1.4 to 1.6 times more likely to spend time thinking about restraining their food intake, considering things like calories.

Those who lost weight had fewer televisions in their home and less high-fat food on hand. They also had more exercise equipment in their homes, the study authors noted.

"You have to pay attention to your home environment if you want to succeed," Phelan said. "Do you have TVs in every room? When you walk into your kitchen, do you see high-fat food or healthy food?"

Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University School of Medicine's Prevention Research Center, noted in the news release that the study's findings were "common sense" and "close to self-evident."

"If you want to choose better foods, keep better foods within reach. Don't just rely on willpower. If you want to be more active, create opportunities for exercise that are always within reach. Don't just rely on motivation," he said.

SOURCES: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, news release, Oct. 23, 2009 Published on: November 03, 2009