ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk

THURSDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- People who don't get enough of the antioxidant vitamins A and C in their diet may be at increased risk for asthma, British researchers say.

The pooled results of 40 studies conducted between 1980 and 2007 showed that people with asthma had a significantly lower dietary intake of vitamin A than those without the disease. The average intake among those with asthma was 182 micrograms a day, which is between a quarter and a third of recommended daily intake.

The review authors also found that people with severe asthma had a significantly lower intake of vitamin C (about half the recommended daily intake) than those with mild asthma. In addition, low circulating levels of vitamin C in the blood and lower dietary intake of foods containing vitamin C were associated with a 12 percent increased risk of asthma.

There was no association between vitamin E intake and asthma risk, but blood levels of vitamin E were much lower among people with severe asthma than in those with mild asthma. Those with severe asthma had an average vitamin E intake of 2 milligrams/day, which is 20 percent lower than the daily recommended amount, the review authors said.

These findings don't prove cause and effect, but they do challenge a study published last year that found no association between antioxidants and asthma risk, said Dr. Jo Leonardi-Bee, of the division of epidemiology and public health at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues.

"Overall, our findings from [the current] systematic review and meta-analysis indicate that low levels of vitamin C intake, and to a lesser extent vitamin A, are consistently associated with asthma risk to a degree that, if causal, would be sufficient to be clinically relevant," they concluded.

Their findings for an association between dietary antioxidants and wheezing were less consistent. The report was published in the current issue of Thorax.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about asthma.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, April 15, 2009

Last Updated: April 16, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com