ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Functional Foods Uncovered
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
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Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk

THURSDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- People who don't get enough of the antioxidant vitamins A and C in their diet may be at increased risk for asthma, British researchers say.

The pooled results of 40 studies conducted between 1980 and 2007 showed that people with asthma had a significantly lower dietary intake of vitamin A than those without the disease. The average intake among those with asthma was 182 micrograms a day, which is between a quarter and a third of recommended daily intake.

The review authors also found that people with severe asthma had a significantly lower intake of vitamin C (about half the recommended daily intake) than those with mild asthma. In addition, low circulating levels of vitamin C in the blood and lower dietary intake of foods containing vitamin C were associated with a 12 percent increased risk of asthma.

There was no association between vitamin E intake and asthma risk, but blood levels of vitamin E were much lower among people with severe asthma than in those with mild asthma. Those with severe asthma had an average vitamin E intake of 2 milligrams/day, which is 20 percent lower than the daily recommended amount, the review authors said.

These findings don't prove cause and effect, but they do challenge a study published last year that found no association between antioxidants and asthma risk, said Dr. Jo Leonardi-Bee, of the division of epidemiology and public health at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues.

"Overall, our findings from [the current] systematic review and meta-analysis indicate that low levels of vitamin C intake, and to a lesser extent vitamin A, are consistently associated with asthma risk to a degree that, if causal, would be sufficient to be clinically relevant," they concluded.

Their findings for an association between dietary antioxidants and wheezing were less consistent. The report was published in the current issue of Thorax.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about asthma.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, April 15, 2009

Last Updated: April 16, 2009

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