ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk

THURSDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- People who don't get enough of the antioxidant vitamins A and C in their diet may be at increased risk for asthma, British researchers say.

The pooled results of 40 studies conducted between 1980 and 2007 showed that people with asthma had a significantly lower dietary intake of vitamin A than those without the disease. The average intake among those with asthma was 182 micrograms a day, which is between a quarter and a third of recommended daily intake.

The review authors also found that people with severe asthma had a significantly lower intake of vitamin C (about half the recommended daily intake) than those with mild asthma. In addition, low circulating levels of vitamin C in the blood and lower dietary intake of foods containing vitamin C were associated with a 12 percent increased risk of asthma.

There was no association between vitamin E intake and asthma risk, but blood levels of vitamin E were much lower among people with severe asthma than in those with mild asthma. Those with severe asthma had an average vitamin E intake of 2 milligrams/day, which is 20 percent lower than the daily recommended amount, the review authors said.

These findings don't prove cause and effect, but they do challenge a study published last year that found no association between antioxidants and asthma risk, said Dr. Jo Leonardi-Bee, of the division of epidemiology and public health at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues.

"Overall, our findings from [the current] systematic review and meta-analysis indicate that low levels of vitamin C intake, and to a lesser extent vitamin A, are consistently associated with asthma risk to a degree that, if causal, would be sufficient to be clinically relevant," they concluded.

Their findings for an association between dietary antioxidants and wheezing were less consistent. The report was published in the current issue of Thorax.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about asthma.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, April 15, 2009

Last Updated: April 16, 2009

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