ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
The Raw Food Diet
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease

(HealthDay News) -- If your levels of vitamin D are too low, you may be at significantly increased risk for stroke, heart disease and death, a new study suggests.

Researchers followed 27,686 people, aged 50 and older, with no history of cardiovascular disease. The participants were divided into three groups based on their vitamin D levels: normal (more than 30 nanograms per milliliter), low (15 to 30 nanograms per milliliter), or very low (less than 15 nanograms per milliliter).

After one year of follow-up, those with very low levels of vitamin D were 77 percent more likely to die, 45 percent more likely to develop coronary artery disease and 78 percent more likely to have a stroke, and twice as likely to develop heart failure compared to people with normal vitamin D levels, the researchers found.

"We concluded that among patients 50 years of age or older, even a moderate deficiency of vitamin D levels was associated with developing coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and death," study co-author Heidi May, an epidemiologist with the Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah, said in a news release from the center.

"This is important because vitamin D deficiency is easily treated. If increasing levels of vitamin D can decrease some risk associated with these cardiovascular diseases, it could have a significant public health impact. When you consider that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in America, you understand how this research can help improve the length and quality of people's lives," May added.

Because this was an observational study, a definitive link between vitamin D levels and heart disease couldn't be established, but the findings point to the need for further research, said study co-author Dr. Brent Muhlestein, director of cardiovascular research at Intermountain's Heart Institute.

"We believe the findings are important enough to now justify randomized treatment trials of supplementation in patients with vitamin D deficiency to determine for sure whether it can reduce the risk of heart disease," Muhlestein said in the news release.

The study was to be presented Monday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.

Vitamin D is obtained from sunlight and by consuming fatty fish or fortified dairy products, including milk.

SOURCES: Intermountain Medical Center, news release, Nov. 16, 2009 Published on: November 16, 2009