ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Barefoot Best for Running?
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
The Unmedicated Mind
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk

MONDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Low levels of vitamin D can boost older women's risk for hip fracture by more than 70 percent, University of Pittsburgh researchers report.

The finding adds weight to the recommendation that people maintain adequate intake of vitamin D, which is primarily made by the skin when it is exposed to sunlight.

The fracture-vitamin D link "has been observed for 15 years," noted Dr. Michael F. Holick, director of the Vitamin D Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University. "The good news is it's consistent, the higher your vitamin D status, the lower the risk of your developing a hip fracture."

The new report appears in the Aug. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Hip fractures can be devastating for older individuals. In fact, 50 percent of older people who suffer a hip fracture will end up in a nursing home and 20 percent will die within the first year due to complications such as a pulmonary embolism resulting from the fracture, Holick said.

For this study, a research team led by Jane A. Cauley from the University of Pittsburgh collected data on 800 women aged 50 to 79. Researchers followed the women for up to nine years to determine their risk for hip fractures.

They found that the risk of hip fracture rose 33 percent with every 25 nanomoles per liter drop in vitamin D levels. Women with the lowest levels of vitamin D had a 71 percent increase risk for hip fractures compared with women with the highest levels of vitamin D, the researchers report.

"We conclude that low serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk for hip fracture in community-dwelling women. The mechanism of association is unclear," the authors wrote.

Holick notes that vitamin D is essential for the body's absorption of calcium, a key component of bone health. "If you don't have adequate vitamin D, you cannot efficiently absorb calcium," he said. "Vitamin D also helps maintain bone health by keeping bone cells active."

According to the U.S. Institute of Medicine, people should get between 200 and 400 international units of vitamin D a day. The best way to get vitamin D, naturally, is by being out in the sun.

As little as 10 to 15 minutes of sun a day can give you all a vitamin D you need. Vitamin D is also available in small quantities in foods such as fish and milk.

Preventing hip fracture is another good reason to keep your vitamin D levels up, Holick said. "To get vitamin D levels to where they need to be to reduce the risk of hip fracture, you need to be taking at least 1,000 international units of vitamin D a day from a supplement," he advised.

Dr. John Jacob Cannell, executive director of the nonprofit Vitamin D Council, agreed that most people are not getting enough of the nutrient.

"Women need to know their vitamin D status," Cannell said. "They need to ask their doctor for the right test," known as the 25 hydroxy D test. "Women should strive to keep your vitamin D levels above 125 nanomoles per liter, year round. To do that, they are going to require supplements."

Cannell recommends that before they get a blood test for vitamin D, women take 2,000 international units of vitamin D a day for three months.

More information

For more about vitamin D, visit the U.S. National Institutes of Health.



SOURCES: John Jacob Cannell, M.D., executive director, Vitamin D Council, Atascadero, Calif.; Michael F. Holick, M.D., Ph.D., director, Vitamin D Skin and Bone Research Laboratory, Boston University; Aug. 19, 2008, Annals of Internal Medicine

Last Updated: Aug. 19, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com