ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors

(HealthDay News) -- Most of the dust that coats your furniture and floors comes from outdoors and can pose a health threat, a new study suggests.

The researchers developed a computer model that can track the distribution of outdoor soil and airborne particles into homes and found that more than 60 percent of household dust originates from tracked-in soil and airborne particles from the outdoors. The remainder is from dead skin shed by residents, fibers from carpets and upholstered furniture.

This outdoor-based dust can contain lead, arsenic and other potentially harmful substances, said the Arizona researchers. For example, they estimated that 60 percent of arsenic in floor dust may come from arsenic in the surrounding air, with the remainder coming from tracked-in soil.

The substances in household dust that originates outdoors may be a special concern for homes with children, who put dust-contaminated toys and other objects into their mouths, said David Layton and Paloma Beamer of the University of Arizona in Tucson, who added that their computer model may prove useful in evaluating ways to reduce contaminants in dust and associated human exposure.

The study was released online in advance of publication in the Nov. 1 print issue of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

SOURCES: Environmental Science & Technology, news release, November 2009