ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Get to Know the Pap Test
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Most older, long-term cancer survivors struggle with good health habits, such as regular exercise and a proper diet, a new study shows.

Those who did exercise and eat well after their treatment, however, tended to have more vitality and a better quality of life, the study also found.

The report, from researchers from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, is published online and in the Sept. 1 print issue of Cancer.

"Our findings point to the potential negative impact of obesity and the positive effect of regular exercise and a healthy diet on physical quality of life outcomes among older, long-term cancer survivors," Catherine Mosher, a postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Sloan-Kettering, said in a news release from the American Cancer Society.

Mosher and her colleagues examined data from more than 750 people who had survived breast, prostate or colorectal cancer for five years or more. All were 65 or older.

Most people expressed interest in pursuing healthy habits, but only 7 percent actually met national guidelines for exercise and diet. The majority reported exercising an average of 10 minutes a week -- far short of the recommended 150 minutes of exercise a week, the study said. Obese survivors had worse physical quality of life.

People aged 65 and older make up more than half of the estimated 11 million cancer survivors in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society.

Numerous studies have linked healthy lifestyle choices with better outcomes after a cancer diagnosis. In one recent study, people who had head and neck cancer appeared to have better survival if they exercised, improved their diet and avoided smoking and heavy alcohol consumption.