ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Most older, long-term cancer survivors struggle with good health habits, such as regular exercise and a proper diet, a new study shows.

Those who did exercise and eat well after their treatment, however, tended to have more vitality and a better quality of life, the study also found.

The report, from researchers from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, is published online and in the Sept. 1 print issue of Cancer.

"Our findings point to the potential negative impact of obesity and the positive effect of regular exercise and a healthy diet on physical quality of life outcomes among older, long-term cancer survivors," Catherine Mosher, a postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Sloan-Kettering, said in a news release from the American Cancer Society.

Mosher and her colleagues examined data from more than 750 people who had survived breast, prostate or colorectal cancer for five years or more. All were 65 or older.

Most people expressed interest in pursuing healthy habits, but only 7 percent actually met national guidelines for exercise and diet. The majority reported exercising an average of 10 minutes a week -- far short of the recommended 150 minutes of exercise a week, the study said. Obese survivors had worse physical quality of life.

People aged 65 and older make up more than half of the estimated 11 million cancer survivors in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society.

Numerous studies have linked healthy lifestyle choices with better outcomes after a cancer diagnosis. In one recent study, people who had head and neck cancer appeared to have better survival if they exercised, improved their diet and avoided smoking and heavy alcohol consumption.