ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Most older, long-term cancer survivors struggle with good health habits, such as regular exercise and a proper diet, a new study shows.

Those who did exercise and eat well after their treatment, however, tended to have more vitality and a better quality of life, the study also found.

The report, from researchers from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, is published online and in the Sept. 1 print issue of Cancer.

"Our findings point to the potential negative impact of obesity and the positive effect of regular exercise and a healthy diet on physical quality of life outcomes among older, long-term cancer survivors," Catherine Mosher, a postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Sloan-Kettering, said in a news release from the American Cancer Society.

Mosher and her colleagues examined data from more than 750 people who had survived breast, prostate or colorectal cancer for five years or more. All were 65 or older.

Most people expressed interest in pursuing healthy habits, but only 7 percent actually met national guidelines for exercise and diet. The majority reported exercising an average of 10 minutes a week -- far short of the recommended 150 minutes of exercise a week, the study said. Obese survivors had worse physical quality of life.

People aged 65 and older make up more than half of the estimated 11 million cancer survivors in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society.

Numerous studies have linked healthy lifestyle choices with better outcomes after a cancer diagnosis. In one recent study, people who had head and neck cancer appeared to have better survival if they exercised, improved their diet and avoided smoking and heavy alcohol consumption.